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LI B RAHY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 

Of ILLINOIS 

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Meredith College 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Quarterly Bulletin 




Twenty-second Catalogue Number 



Announcements for 1921-1922 






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Series 14 March, 1921 Number 3 



Meredith College 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Quarterly Bulletin 




Twenty-second Catalogue Number 
Announcements for 1921-1922 

Published by Meredith. College in November, January, March and May 

Entered as second-class matter, January 13, 1908, at the post-office at Raleigh, N. 0. 
under the act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



Raleigh, N. C. 

Edwards & Broughton Printing Co., 

1921 






Contents 

PAGE 

Calendar 9 

Calendar for the Year 10 

Board of Trustees 11 

Committees of the Trustees 12 

Officers of Administration and Instruction 13 

Committee of the Faculty 17 

Officers of the Alumnae Association 17 

Meredith College 18 

Foundation 18 

Location 18 

Buildings 19 

Laboratories 20 

Library 20 

Religious Life 21 

Government 22 

Physical Education 22 

Hygiene and Care of Sick 23 

Literary Societies 23 

Publications 24 

Lecture Course 24 

Commencement, 1920 25 

Expenses 26 

Tuition 26 

Fees 26 

Table Board 26 

Room Rent 27 

Expenses for the Year in the Literary Course 27 

Payment of Fees 28 

Admission Requirements 30 

Admission to College Classes 31 

Conditioned Students 32 

Special Students 32 

Routine of Entrance 32 



6 Meredith College 

Admission: page 

Definition of Entrance Requirements 33 

English 33 

French 35 

German 36 

Latin 36 

History 37 

Mathematics 39 

Bible 40 

Sciences 41 

Requirements for Graduation 43 

Degrees 43 

Bachelor of Arts 43 

Bachelor of Science 44 

General Regulations for Academic Work 44 

Credits 44 

Reports 44 

Conditions and Deficiencies 45 

Outline of Course for the A.B. Degree 46 

Outline of Course for the B.S. Degree 48 

Schedule of Recitations 50 

Schedule of Laboratory Work 51 

Courses of Instruction 52 

Biology 52 

Chemistry 54 

Education and Psychology 55 

English 61 

French 63 

German 65 

History and Economics 67 

Home Economics 69 

Latin and Greek 71 

Mathematics 73 

Physics and Geology 75 

Religious Education 76 

Social Science 79 

Spanish 80 



Contents 7 

PAGE 

School of Music 81 

Faculty 83 

Aim and Equipment 85 

Admission to Music Classes 85 

Literary Requirements 85 

Musical and Technical Requirements 86 

Piano 86 

Organ 87 

Violin 87 

Voice 88 

Theory 88 

Conditioned Students 88 

Irregular Students 89 

Requirements for Graduation 89 

Public School Music 90 

Students' Recitals 90 

Concerts 91 

Music Supplies 91 

Outline of Course for Diploma in School of Music 92 

Outline of Course in Public School Music 94 

Schedule of Recitations 96 

Theoretical Courses 97 

Theory 97 

Harmony 97 

Analysis 98 

Composition 98 

History of Music 99 

Music Pedagogy 99 

Public School Methods 100 

Ensemble Playing 100 

Interpretation Class 101 

Chorus and Choir Training 101 

Department of Pianoforte 102 

Department of Organ 103 

Department of Violin 104 

Department of Voice Culture 106 



Meredith College 



PAGE 

Needs of College 107 

Register and Summary of College Students 109 

Register and Summary of Art Students 116 

Register and Summary of Music Students 118 

Summary of all Students Taking College Work 125 

Summary by States 125 



1921 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



1922 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



Calendar for the Year 1921-1922 

Sept. 7. Wednesday First semester begins. Examinations for 

making up conditions and deficiencies. 

Sept. 7-8. Matriculation and registration of all 

students. 

Sept. 9. Friday Lectures and class work begin. 

Nov. 24. Thursday Thanksgiving Day; a holiday. 

Dec. 12. Monday Examinations for making up conditions 

and deficiencies. 

Dec. 22. Thursday 3:30 p. m. Christmas recess begins. 

Jan. 4. Wednesday 8:30 a. m. Christmas recess ends. 

Jan. 17-25. First semester examinations. 

Jan. 25. Wednesday Matriculation and registration of new 

students. 

Jan. 26. Thursday Lectures and class work of second 

semester begin. 

Feb. 2. Thursday Founders' Day; a half holiday. 

March 18-20. Spring vacation. 

May 1. Monday Examinations for making up conditions 

and deficiencies. 

May 18-27. Second semester examinations. 

May 27. Saturday Students must submit to the dean their 

schedule of work for 1922-1923. 

May 27-30. Commencement. 



Board of Trustees 



Wesley Norwood Jones, A.B., President Raleigh 

Rev. Martin Luther Kesler, A.B., Vice-President Thomasville 

Joseph Dozier Boushall, a.B., Secretary Raleigh 

Terms Expire 1921 

Joseph Dozier Boushall, A.B Raleigh 

Bertha Lucretia Carroll, A.B Raleigh 

Zebulon Marvin Caviness, M.D Raleigh 

Benjamin Franklin Huntley Winston-Salem 

James Yadkin Joyner, Ph.B., LL.D Raleigh 

Rev. Martin Luther Kesler, A.B Thomasville 

Daniel Harris Penton ' Wilmington 

William Louis Poteat, A.M., LL.D Wake Forest 

Terms Expire 1923 

Rev. William Rufus Bradshaw, A.B Hickory 

Wesley Norwood Jones, A.B Raleigh 

Stephen McIntyre, A.B Lumberton 

William Oscar Riddick, A.B Asheville 

Robert Henry Riggsbee Durham 

Robert Nirwana Simms, A.B., B.L Raleigh 

William Atha Thomas Statesville 

Rev. George Thomas Watkins, A.B., Th.G Goldsboro 

Walter Herbert Weatherspoon, A.B Laurinburg 

Terms Expire 1925 

John Thomas Johnson Battle, A.M., M.D Greensboro 

Joseph Gooch Blalock, A.B., Th.M Weldon 

Samuel Mitchell Brinson, A.B New Bern 

Amos Graves Cox Winterville 

Mrs. Margaret Shields Everett, A.B Greenville 

Edwin McKee Goodwin, A.M Morganton 

Carey Johnson Hunter, B.S Raleigh 

Rev. Livingston Johnson, D.D Raleigh 

TREASURER 
William Arthur Yost Raleigh 



Executive Committee 

Carey Johnson Huntee, Chairman. 
Joseph Dozier Boushall. 
Bertha Lucretia Carroll. 
Zebulon Marvin Caviness. 
Livingston Johnson. 
Wesley Norwood Jones. 
James Yadkin Joyner. 
William Louis Poteat. 
Robert Nirwana Simms. 

Financial and Auditing Committee 

Joseph Dozier Boushall, Chairman. 
Carey Johnson Hunter. 
Wesley Norwood Jones. 
Robert Nirwana Simms. 

Buildings and Grounds Committee 

Robert Nirwana Simms, Chairman. 
Joseph Dozier Boushall. 



Officers of Administration and Instruction 



Administrative Officers 

CHAS. EDWARD BREWER, A.M., Ph.D., 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE, A.M., GRADUATE STUDENT JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY J 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY, PH.D. 

PRESIDENT. 

J. GREGORY BOOMHOUR, A.B., A.M., 

COLGATE UNIVERSITY, A.B. ; UNIVERSITY OP CHICAGO, A.M. 
DEAN. 

EVELYN MILDRED CAMPBELL, A.B., B.S., M.A., 

BESSIE TIFT, A.B. ; COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, B.S., M.A. 
DEAN OF WOMEN 



* Faculty and Other Officers 

ELIZABETH DELIA DIXON CARROLL, M.D., 

WOMAN'S MEDICAL COLLEGE OF THE NEW YORK INFIRMARY. 
PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY; COLLEGE PHYSICIAN. 

f ELIZABETH AVERY COLTON, B.S., A.M., 

STUDENT MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE; COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, A.M. 
PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH. 

LEMUEL ELMER McMILLAN FREEMAN, A.B., A.M., B.D., Th.D., 

FURMAN UNIVERSITY, A.B. ; HARVARD UNIVERSITY, A.M. ; NEWTON THEOLOGICAL 

INSTITUTION, B.D. ; SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, TH.D. ; 

STUDENT UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. 

PROFESSOR OF BIBLE AND SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

HELEN HULL LAW, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 

VASSAR COLLEGE, A.B., A.M. ; UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, PH.D. 
PROFESSOR OF LATIN AND GREEK. 



* For the faculty of School of Music see page 83. 
f On leave of absence 1920-1921. 



14 Meredith College 

CATHERINE ALLEN, A.B., A.M., 

OBEELIN COLLEGE, A.B. ; UNIVERSITY OP CHICAGO, A.M. ; STUDENT HARVARD UNI- 
VERSITY J UNIVERSITY OP BERLIN; THE SORBONNE. 

PROFESSOR OF FRENCH AND HEAD OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

J. GREGORY BOOMHOUR, A.B., A.M., 

COLGATE UNIVERSITY, A.B. ; UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, A.M. 
PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOS. 

ERNEST F. CANADAY, A.B., A.M., 

WILLIAM JEWEL COLLEGE, A.B. J UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI, A.M. 
PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS 

EDWIN McKOY HIGHSMITH, Ph.B., A.M., 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA, PH.B., A.M.; PEABODY COLLEGE, A.M. 
PROFESSOR OF EDUCATION. 



OLIVE L. NORMINGTON, B.S., 

MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, B.S. 
PROFESSOR OF HOME ECONOMICS. 

SAMUEL GAYLE RILEY, A.B., A.M., 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, A.B., A.M. 
PROFESSOR OF HISTORY AND ECONOMICS 

LULA GAINES WINSTON, B.S., Ph.D., 

RICHMOND COLLEGE, B.S. ; JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, PH.D. 
PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY. 

JULIA MOESEL HABER, A.B., A.M., 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY, A.B., A.M. 
PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY. 

MARY SUSAN STEELE, A.B., A.M., 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY, A.B., A.M. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN ENGLISH 

BEATRICE M. TEAGUE, A.B., A.M., 

UNIVERSITY OF DENVER, A.B., A.M. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN FRENCH 

LUCRETIA DOUGLAS BAKER, A.B., A.M., 

WINTHROP COLLEGE, A.B. ; UNrVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA, A.M. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY. 



fleers of Administration and Instruction 15 



HELEN F. EPLER, A.B., 

VASSAR, A.B. ; STUDENT AT UNIVERSITY OF PARIS, UNIVERSITY OF BERNE, 
MARBURG, BELLINZONA. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN MODERN LANGUAGES 



AVIS LEONE KIDWELL, A.B., A.M., 

OTTAWA UNIVERSITY, A.B. ; CORNELL UNIVERSITY, A.M. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN ENGLISH 

* MARY LYNCH JOHNSON, A.B., 

MEREDITH COLLEGE, A.B. 
INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION. 

MARY JANE CARROLL, A.B., 

MEREDITH COLLEGE, A.B. 
INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

EVA LOUISE DEAN, A.B., 

MEREDITH COLLEGE, A.B. 
INSTRUCTOR IN MODERN LANGUAGES. 

CARMEN LOU ROGERS, A.B., 

MEREDITH COLLEGE, A.B. 
INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION. 



DINGLEY BROWN, Mus.D., 

LONDON COLLEGE OF MUSIC, LICENTIATE, AND DOCTOR OF MUSIC; FELLOW OF 
SCIENCE AND ARTS, LONDON. 

PROFESSOR OF THEORETICAL WORK. 



LAURA I. BACON, A.B., 

SHORTER COLLEGE, A.B. ; STUDENT NEW YORK SCHOOL OF ART; ACADEMY OF 
DRAWING AND PAINTING, DRESDEN. 

PROFESSOR OF ART HISTORY. 



ANNE STEPHENS NOBLE, 

STUDENT CHOWAN COLLEGE; MRS. E. N. MARTIN, WASHINGTON, D. C. ; MISS MASON, 

NEW YORK CITY. 

INSTRUCTOR IN CHINA PAINTING. 



WILLIAM JASPER FERRELL, A.B., 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE, A.B. ; STUDENT OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY. 
BURSAR. 



* On leave of absence 1920-1921. 



16 Meredith College 

MARGARET FORGEUS, A.B., 

BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY, A.B. ; DREXEL INSTITUTE LIBRARY SCHOOL. 
LIBRARIAN. 

GERTRUDE ROYSTER, 

GRADUATE OF ST. MARY'S SCHOOL; STATE NORMAL COLLEGE; SPECIAL STUDENT OT 
PHYSICAL TRAINING AT TRINITY COLLEGE, COLUMBIA AND YALE. 

DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

LATTIE RHODES, 

COKER COLLEGE. 
SECRETARY TO THE PRESIDENT 

MARY FRANCES WELCH, B.S., 

HILMAN COLLEGE, B.S. ; GRADUATE OF SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS AND 
DIETETICS OF BATTLE CREEK SANATARIUM. 

DIETITIAN. 

janet Mcdonald, 

MATRON. 

MRS. BEULAH WRIGHT COOPER, 

STEWARDESS FOR THE MEREDITH CLUB 

MRS. OCTAVIA SCARBOROUGH NORWOOD, 

NURSE. 



KATHERINE BROWN, 
BERTHA MOORE, 

ALMA CLAY 
DORIS TILLERY, 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS IN LIBRARY 

SYBIL SMITH, 

STUDENT ASSISTANT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

RUTH COUCH, 

STUDENT ASSISTANT IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

MARY JOHNSON, 

SARAH NOOE, 
CARRIE PIERCE, 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS IN CHEMISTRY. 



Committees of the Faculty 

Advanced Standing — Miss Steele, Mr. Boomhour. 
Appointments — President Brewer, Mr. Highsmith, Mr. Brown. 
Athletics — Miss Royster, Miss O'Brien, Miss Carroll. 
Bulletin — President Brewer, Miss Steele, Miss Johnson. 
Catalogue — Mr. Boomhour, Miss Teague, Mr, Canaday. 
Classification — The Dean, with the heads of the departments. 
Executive — President Brewer, Dean Boomhour, Miss Campbell, 

Miss Law, Miss Allen. 
Grounds — Miss Welch, Mrs. Cooper, Mr. Ferrell. 
Lectures — Mr. Riley, Miss Winston, Mr. Freeman. 
Library — Mr. Freeman, Miss C. Allen, Miss Law. 
Public Functions — Miss Campbell, Mr. Brown, Mrs. Ferrell. 
Concerts — Mr. Brown, Miss Eiberg, Miss Snider. 



Officers of the Alumnae Association, 1920-1921 

President — Marguerite Higgs Greenville, N. C. 

Vice-President — Mrs. J. W. Bunn Raleigh, N. C. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. R. M. Squires Wake Forest, N. C. 

Corresponding Secretary — Carmen Rogers Raleigh, N. C. 

Treasurer — Leonita Denmark Raleigh, N. C 

Chairman Meredith Clubs — Kate Johnson Thomasville, N. C 

Secretary Meredith Clubs — Mrs. E. N. Johnson Reidsville, N. C. 



Meredith College 

Foundation 

Meredith College, founded by the Baptist State Convention 
of North Carolina, was granted a charter by the State Legis- 
lature in 1891, and was first opened to students on September 
27, 1899. It is named Meredith College in honor of the Rever- 
end Thomas Meredith, for many years a noted leader of the 
Baptist denomination in North Carolina. This name is espe- 
cially appropriate, for Thomas Meredith presented a report to 
the Baptist State Convention of 1838 strongly recommending 
the establishment of an institution in Raleigh for the higher 
education of women. 

By the last treasurer's report, May 1, 1919, the value of the 
college grounds and buildings was $275,500, and of the equip- 
ment $46,050, making a total value of the real property and 
equipment of $321,550. The productive endowment, by the 
same report, was $143,132.22, the nonproductive fund $28,600, 
and the deferred endowment $15,000, making a total endowment 
fund of $186,732.22, and a grand total of $508,282.22. By 
the bursar's report of the same year the receipts from students 
and miscellaneous sources, with assets, were $121,988.53. The 
General Education Board has recognized the worth of the col- 
lege by voting aid to the endowment fund. 

As a result of the South-wide campaign to secure seventy-five 
million dollars for all objects fostered by the Southern Baptist 
Convention Meredith College will secure funds for a consider- 
able increase in endowment and equipment. 

Location 

Meredith College is admirably located in Raleigh, the edu- 
cational center of the State. The number of schools and col- 
leges is due not only to the broad educational interest center- 
ing in the State capital, but also to the natural environment 



Buildings 19 

and healthful climate. Raleigh is situated on the edge of the 
plateau which overlooks the coastal plain, and is 365 feet above 
sea-level; thus it is favorably affected both by the climate of 
the seacoast and by that of the mountains. The water supply, 
too, is excellent; it comes from a short, never-failing stream 
which has a controlled watershed, and it is regularly tested by 
experts. 

The college itself is in the center of the city, near the Capi- 
tol, and only a few blocks from the State and Olivia Raney 
Libraries. Within three blocks to the west and southeast are the 
First Baptist Church and the Baptist Tabernacle, respectively; 
churches of other leading denominations are also near. Among 
the many advantages of college life in the capital city is the 
opportunity of hearing concerts and important addresses by 
distinguished speakers in the city auditorium and of attending 
the meetings of the State legislature, the annual meeting of the 
North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, the State 
Social Service Conference, and other noteworthy gatherings. 

Buildings 

The college has at present ten buildings : Main Building, 
Eaircloth Hall, Home Economics Building, East Building, and 
six cottages. 

Main Building, completed in 1899, contains the chapel, execu- 
tive offices, classrooms, laboratories, library, art studio, living 
rooms and dining-room. 

Eaircloth Hall, built in 1904, accommodates ninety-six stu- 
dents, two in a room, and contains four large classrooms, the 
music practice rooms, and the two society halls. 

The Home Economics Building, purchased in 1913, and first 
used in 1914, contains the lecture room and laboratories of the 
department of Home Economics, and the president's living 
rooms. 



20 Meredith College 

East Building, purchased in 1899, contains dormitory and 
dining-rooms, and Y. W. C. A. reception room. 

Each of these buildings, except the Home Economics Build- 
ing, is of brick. All are lighted by electricity and heated by 
steam, and have bath-rooms with hot and cold water on each 
floor. The rooms, homelike and attractive, with plenty of light 
and fresh air, show ample provision for comfort and health. 

North and South cottages, purchased in 1900, the Person 
Street cottage, purchased in 1916, and the Adams cottage, pur- 
chased in 1919, are heated by stoves or grates, but in other 
respects are equipped like the other buildings. 

The regulations for all buildings are the same. There are 
no discriminations among the students in any way. 

A night watchman is employed throughout the year. 

Laboratories 

The laboratories are furnished with water, gas, compound 
microscopes, lockers, chemicals, and apparatus for individual 
work in chemistry, physics, biology, and home economics. 

The State Museum, to which additions are continually being 
made, is of much service to the department of science. 

Library 

The library is in charge of a trained librarian and is scien- 
tifically classified and catalogued. There have been added 
twenty-one hundred volumes to the library during the current 
year. 

There are nine thousand and one hundred volumes and two 
thousand and two hundred pamphlets in the library. These 
have been selected by heads of departments and are in constant 
use by the students. Ninety-one magazines, seventeen college 
magazines, and seventeen newspapers are received regularly 
throughout the college year. 



Religious Life 21 

In addition to the library of Meredith College, the Olivia 
Kaney Library, of some sixteen thousand, and the State Library 
of fifty-two thousand volumes, are open to students, and are 
within three blocks of the college. The State Library offers 
to students of American history unusual advantages in North 
Carolina and Southern history. 

Religious Life 

All boarding students are required to attend the chapel serv- 
ices which begin the work each day. For those who do not 
attend voluntarily Sunday school and church services on Sun- 
day mornings at least eighty-five per cent of the time, roll-call 
attendance is required. 

The Young Woman's Christian Association is the all inclusive 
religious organization of the College. The work and direction 
of this body are under the management of the students, assisted 
by a faculty advisory committee. The faculty may become 
members of the Association, and as such share in the meetings. 
The Association stands for a deeper spiritual life among the 
members, and for a united effort to help others to live consistent 
Christian lives. A devotional meeting is held every Sunday 
night, this service aiming at fixing the key-note for the week. 

The Young Woman's Auxiliary, with an independent corps of 
officers, with definite denominational affiliation, is in reality 
the missionary department of the Young Woman's Christian 
Association of Meredith College. All missionary contributions 
are directed through denominational channels, gifts to 75 mil- 
lion campaign pledges being made through home church and 
reported to treasurer of Young Woman's Auxiliary. 

The four B. Y. P. U.'s, maintained as the Training depart- 
ment of the association, reach every student and serve as the 
connecting link between the College religious life and the home. 

Mission study classes and S. S. Teacher Training, under the 
direction of members of the faculty and students, are pursuing 
systematic courses of study, the aim of which is to give the 



22 Meredith College 

student a more thorough knowledge of mission work and to fit 
each one for an efficient, intelligent work in Sunday school. 
During the past year there has been a Student Volunteer Band 
of 20 members for Foreign Missions and an associate band of 
56 members, who are planning for work in the Home Field. 

Government 

A system of student government prevails in the College, the 
basis of which is a set of regulations submitted by the faculty 
and adopted by the students. The executive committee of the 
Student Government Association has general oversight of order 
and deportment among the students. An advisory committee 
from the faculty, however, assists the students in the solving 
of difficult problems. The restrictions imposed by this system 
of government are believed to be only those which will tend 
to bring about a normal, wholesome student life, and any who 
are not willing to be guided by them should not apply for 
admission to the College. 

Physical Education 

All students when entering College are given a physical ex- 
amination by the resident physician and physical director. If 
this should show reasons why a student should not take the regu- 
lar work, then special exercises adapted to her needs will be 
prescribed for her. A special examination is required before 
a student is entered for the heavy field sports. 

On the college grounds are courts for tennis, basketball, 
volleyball, and a well-equipped out-of-door gymnasium, with 
climbing ropes, teeter-ladders, giant-stride or merry-go-round, 
vaulting-bars, chest-bars, and flying-rings. 

All students, except seniors, are required to exercise four half- 
hours a week throughout the session. As far as possible stu- 
dents are organized in classes according to the number of years 
that they have had the work. Basketball, volleyball, or tennis 
may be substituted twice a week for the regular class work. 



Literary Societies 23 

Students are credited in the physical and field work on the 
basis of faithfulness and punctuality. 

An annual exhibition of the class work is held in April, and 
ribbons and letters are given upon the basis of proficiency. At 
the close of the inter-class basketball games letters are awarded 
to the five best players. A handsome silver loving cup is also 
offered yearly to the team winning in an inter-class basketball 
contest. To the champions of the inter-class tennis tournament 
letters are awarded. 

The athletic committee of the faculty, with the physical direc- 
tor, has control of all field sports. 

Hygiene and Care of the Sick 

A well equipped sanitarium under the direction of an efficient 
nurse is maintained for benefit of students unable to attend 
regular work on account of sickness. Once a month during the 
year the physician in charge lectures to the student-body on 
general hygiene and the care of the body. Every student is 
required to attend these lectures except in her junior and senior 
years. 

The physician in charge holds office hours at the College, at 
which time the students may consult her upon all subjects of 
hygiene or relative to their personal health. The general laws 
of health are enforced so far as possible. It is the purpose of 
the College physician to prevent sickness by means of the 
knowledge and proper observance of hygienic conditions. The 
food of the sick is under the direction of the physician and 
nurse. 

Literary Societies 

There are two literary societies : Philaretian and Astrotekton, 
meeting every Saturday night. These societies are organized 
to give variety to the College life and to promote general 
culture. 

Students will join society of their choice at first opportunity 
after entering school. Students will be allowed to select the 



24 Meredith College 

literary society which they wish to join ; provided, that no more 
than three-fifths of the total society membership shall belong to 
either society. 

Each society offers a memorial medal for the best English 
essay. The Carter-Upchurch medal of the Astrotekton Society 
is the gift of Mr. Paschal Andrews Carter, of New York City. 
The Minnie Jackson Bowling medal of the Philaretian Society 
is given by Dr. Edward Holt Bowling, of Durham. 

It is believed that secret societies are undemocratic and will 
detract from the interest and value of the literary societies. 
The organization of sororities or clubs of any sort is, therefore, 
prohibited. 

College Publications 

By the College 

The Bulletin. — This is the official publication of the College, 
and appears quarterly. It will be mailed to any address regu- 
larly upon request to the President. 

By the Students 

The Acorn. — This is the monthy magazine of the students. 
It will be mailed to any address upon receipt by the Business 
Manager of the subscription price, one dollar. 

Oak Leaves, the College Annual, is published by the Literary 
Societies. Any one desiring this should commnicate with the 
Business Manager of the Annual. 

Chapel Speakers and Other Lecturers, 1920-1921 

Sept. 9, 1920, Dr. Richard T. Vann— New Party and New Plat- 

form, Proposed. 
Oct. 25, 1920, Dr. Edward T. Devine — Revolution, Reaction, 

Reconstruction. 



Chapel Speakers and Other Lecturers 25 

-. . 2 „ 1Q20 c Series of lectures and discussions under aus- 

N ' 2 1920* } Pices of Y. W. C. A. on Training for Citir 

| zenship. 

Oct. 28, 1920, Rev. J. Clyde Turner — Special Mission Sermon. 

Oct. 29, 1920, M. T. Yamamoto — America and Japan. 

Nov. 11, 1920, John H. Boushall — Armistice Day; Its Signifi- 

cance. 

Nov. 23, 1920, Eugene Turner, Y. M. C. A. Secretary from 

China — China a Field of Opportunity. 

Dec. 12, 1920, Mr. Fred Smith — Dominant Influence of Woman. 

Jan. 18, 1921, Dr. Leon Tucker — Ideals. 

Jan. 20, 1921, Dr. A. C. Dixon — Harmonies. 

Jan. 21, 1921, Mrs. Geo. W. Dibble— Old Standards. 

Jan. 26, 1921, ( Miss Katharine Lumpkin, Y. W. C. A. Secre- 

Feb. 3, 1921, ( tary. 

Jan. 30, 1921, Dr. Howard Rondthaler — The Thirty Silent 

Years of Christ's Life. 

Feb. 4, 1921, Prof. E. C. Lindeman — Recreation. 

Feb. 4, 1921, Viljalmur Stefansson — My Five Years in the 

Arctic. 

Feb. 8, 1921, Miss Susan Bancroft Tyler— Y. W. A. in the 

Colleges. 

Feb. 10, 1921, Dr. J. Elwood Welsh— Founders' Day— Call of 

the New Day to the Truly Educated. 

Feb. 10-14, 1921, Dr. Chas. E. Maddry — Series of Evangelistic 
Services. 

Feb. 21-26, 1921, Health Week — Series of Lectures under aus- 
picies of Student Government Association and 
Y. W. C. A. 

March 10, 1921, Prof. Chas. Heck — China Relief Work. 

March 14-19, 1921, Miss Margaret Frost — Sunday School Teacher- 
Training. 

Commencement, 1920 

William Joseph McGlothlin, A.B., Ph.D., LL.D., Baccalaureate Ser- 
mon; Missionary Sermon. 

Edwin Mims, A.B., Ph.D., Literary Address — The Challenge of the 
Present Hour. 



Expenses 



Tuition Each Semester 

College course $40.00 

Literary and theoretical work in Music Course (see p. — ) . . . 40.00 

Public School Music (Music students) 5.00 

*Piano $37.50, 45.00 

Organ 45.00 

*Violin 45.00 

Voice $35.00, $37.50, 45.00 

Fees Each Semester 

Matriculation fee (applied on semester's tuition) $ 25.00 

Incidental fee 10.00 

Chemical laboratory fee 2.50 

Biological laboratory fee 2.50 

Physics laboratory fee 2.50 

Cooking laboratory fee 7.50 

Sewing laboratory fee 1.00 

Library fee 2.50 

Lecture-Concert fee 2.50 

Gymnasium fee 1.00 

Medical fee 5.00 

Ensemble or Chamber Music 50 

Interpretation Class 50 

Use of piano one hour daily 4.50 

For each additional hour 2.25 

Use of pedal organ one hour daily 6.00 

Use of pipe organ, per hour 25 

Table Board Each Semester 

Main Building $100.00 

Club (estimated) 56.00 



* In the department of Preparatory Music, Music tuition is $30.00 a semester. 



Summary of Expenses. 2T 

Room Rent Each Semester 

Including fuel, light, and water: 

Main Building j Front rooms or two-girl rooms $30.00 

/ Other rooms in Main Building 27.50 

FairclothHall j Frontr00ms 30 - 00 

1 Other rooms in Faircloth Hall 27.50 



Myatt Building 27.50 

East Building 25.00 

Cottages 22.50 

Summary of Expenses for the Year in the 
Literary Course 

In Main Building: 

Board, room, lights, fuel, and bath $245.00 to $260.00 

Tuition, college course 80.00 

Medical fee 10.00 

Library fee 5.00 

Gymnasium fee 2.00 

Lecture-Concert fee 5.00 

Incidental fee 20.00 



Total $367.00 to $382.00 

With board in the club this amount is about $90.00 less. 

In view of the uncertainty of prices of supplies the charge for 
board cannot be guaranteed. It is hoped, however, that no increase 
over the above figures will be required. 

All bills are due in advance for the semester, but for the con- 
venience of patrons payments may be made at the beginning of each 
quarter. 

Students who pursue Music may take one literary subject at a cost 
of $17.50 a semester. 

Students pursuing one special course may take one literary sub- 
ject at $17.50 a semester, or two literary subjects &l $30.00 a 
semester, or three literary subjects at $37.50 a semester. 

Special students may elect Art History or one theoretical course 
in the School of Music at $17.50 a semester or two theoretical courses 
in the School of Music at $30.00 a semester. 



28 Meredith College 

Students in the A.B. or B.S. course may elect Art History, or theo- 
retical courses in the School of Music which count toward their 
degree, at $6.25 each semester. 

Graduation fee, including diploma, $5.00. 

Nonresident students are excused from the payment of the medical 
fee and also of the gymnasium and lecture fees unless they wish to 
take these courses, but are required to pay the library fee if they 
take any class work. 

Nonresident students may take any one course in the literary 
department at $17.50 a semester or two such courses at $30.00 a 
semester. 

If a student withdraws from the institution, or is sent away for 
misconduct, before the semester expires, no charges for tuition, room 
rent, or incidental expenses for that semester, and no charges for 
board for the quarter in which she leaves, will be remitted. But in 
event of sickness of such a nature as in the opinion of the college 
physician requires the retirement of the student, the charges for 
board may be refunded from the date of retirement, upon the order 
of the executive committee, provided that no reduction will be made 
for absence of less than four weeks. 

Teachers remaining during the Christmas recess will be charged 
regular table board. 

The medical fee of $10.00 meets the charges for the college phy- 
sician and the college nurse. Any services in addition to this, as 
well as all prescriptions, will be paid for by the patron receiving the 
benefit of the same. 

In the club the students, under the direction of an experienced 
dietitian, do their own cooking and serving. The work is distribu- 
ted so that not more than one-half hour a day is required of any one 
student. The table board in this way is reduced to $50.00 a semester. 
Eleven dollars is due at the beginning of each month. This year 
ninety-three students have taken their meals in the club. 



The Payment of Fees 



On days of registration at the beginning of each semester all stu- 
dents are required to pay to the bursar the matriculation fee of $25 
before registering with the dean. 

No student may enter any class at the beginning of either semester 
until she has paid the matriculation fee for that semester. 

Any student who fails to register with the dean at the appointed 
time will be required to pay the bursar an additional fee of $1 and 



The Payment of Fees 29 

to show receipt for the same to the dean. This special fee of $1 will 
be required of those who are late in entering as well as of those who 
neglect to arrange their courses with the dean, and will not be 
deducted from any bill. For time of registration see page 32. 

To secure rooms, application must be accompanied by a deposit of 
$10. No definite room can be assigned except at the college office. 
Any preference in rooms will be given in the order of application. 

The $10 room fee deposit and the $25 matriculation fee will be 
deducted from the first bill of each semester, but they are not return- 
able under any circumstances. 



Admission Requirements 

Students are admitted either (A) by certificate or (B) by 
examination. 

A. Meredith College accepts all certificates of work com- 
pleted in high schools accredited by the University of North 
Carolina or by the State High School Inspector or from 
high schools in other states accredited by universities belong- 
ing to the Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools 
of the Southern States. The College also accepts certifi- 
cates from its own list of approved private and church 
schools. All certificate students, however, are admitted on 
probation. Those whose work proves unsatisfactory within 
the first month will be advised to take the next lower course. 

Students desiring to be admitted on certificate should 
send to the president, if possible before their graduation, 
for a blank certificate to be filled out and signed by the 
principal of the school they are attending. Candidates will 
find it much easier to attend to this before their schools 
close for the summer. All certificates should be filed with 
the president not later than August 1st of the year in which 
the student wishes to enter. 

~No candidate will be admitted to the freshman class, 
except on examination, until such a certificate, properly 
filled out and signed by the principal, is presented to the 
College. 

B. Students desiring to be admitted under the second of 
these conditions should see page 3'2. 

Every candidate applying for advanced standing should read 
CKEDITS, page 44, and after satisfying entrance requirements, 
must file with the dean an official report of her previous work, 
and a catalogue of the institution from which she comes, plainly 
marked for courses. 



Admission 31 

Admission to College Classes 

For full admission to the freshman class a candidate must 
offer fifteen units of work. A unit represents four one-hour 
recitations or five forty-five-minute recitations a week through- 
out a secondary school year. 

Every candidate for the A.B. degree must offer : 

English 3 units 

Latin 4 units 

or 
Latin 3 units i 

and J 5 units 

French or German or Spanish .... 2 units / 

Algebra 1.5 units 



! 



Mathematics: , Geometry x unit 

Elective* 5.5 or 4.5 units 

Total 15 units 

Every candidate for the degress in Home Economics must 
offer: 

English 3 units 

Frenchf 2 units 

Germanf 2 units 

Algebra 1.5 units 



Mathematics: ( Geometry x unit 

Elective! 5.5 units 

Total 15 units 



* The elective units must be selected from the following: History, Bible, Science, 
Cooking, Agriculture, Vegetable Gardening, Commercial Geography, a fourth unit 
in Latin, an additional unit in French or German, an additional half-unit in Plane 
Trigonometry, Solid Geometry, or Advanced Algebra. Not more than four half- 
unit courses will be accepted. 

t Four units of Latin may be substituted for both French and German, or three 
units of Latin may be substituted for either French or German ; or two units of 
Spanish may be substituted for two units of either French or German; one of the 
languages offered for entrance must be continued for at least one year in college. 

t The required and elective subjects allowed for entrance to the A.B. course 
may be offered; also a half -unit in Mechanical Drawing, Free-hand Drawing, or 
•Sewing may be offered. Not more than four half-unit courses will be accepted. 



Meredith College 



Conditioned Students 

A freshman may be conditioned to the extent of two units. 
These conditions must be removed by the end of the sophomore 
year at the regular periods set for removing conditions and 
deficiencies. (See page 45.) Members of other classes may 
have conditions not exceeding three hours. 

Special Students 

Special students are admitted without examination under the 
following conditions: (1) They must be at least twenty years 
of age; (2) they must give proof of adequate preparations for 
the courses sought: (3) they must take fifteen hours of work 
a week, except mature students living in Raleigh. 

Routine of Entrance 

1. Registration. — All students, upon arrival at the College, 
should report at the office of the president and register. 

2. Matriculation. — On September 7 and 8 all students should 
report at the office of the bursar and pay the required fee. 
Matriculation for the second semester should be completed on 
or before January 25. 

3. Classification. — On September 7 and 8 all students will 
appear before the classification committee in order to have 
their schedules for the semester arranged. All schedules must 
be approved by the dean. Those desiring credit for college 
courses must apply to the committee on advanced standing. 

Schedules for the second semester will be arranged by the 
dean on or before January 25. 



Admission 33 



Definition of Entrance Requirements 

ENGLISH (3 units) 

Upon the recommendation of the National Conference on Uniform 
Entrance Requirements in English, the following requirements have 
been adopted, 1920-1922: 

The study of English in school has two main objects, which should 
be considered of equal importance: (1) command of correct and 
clear English, spoken and written; (2) ability to read with accu- 
racy, intelligence, and appreciation, and the development of the 
habit of reading good literature with enjoyment. 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

The first object requires instruction in grammar and composition. 
English grammar should ordinarily be reviewed in the secondary 
school, and correct spelling and grammatical accuracy should be 
rigorously exacted in connection with all written work during the 
four years. The principles of English composition governing punc- 
tuation, the use of words, sentences and paragraphs should be thor- 
oughly mastered, and practice in composition, oral as well as 
written, should extend throughout the secondary-school period. 
"Written exercises may well comprise letter-writing, narration, de- 
scription, and easy exposition and argument. It is advisable that 
subjects for this work be taken from the student's personal experi- 
ence, general knowledge, and studies other than English, as well as 
from his reading in literature. Finally, special instruction in lan- 
guage and composition should be accompanied by concerted effort 
of teachers in all branches to cultivate in the student the habit of 
using good English in his recitations and various exercises, whether 
oral or written. 

LITERATURE 

The second object is sought by means of the reading and study of 
a number of books from which may be framed a progressive course 
in literature. The student should be trained in reading aloud and 
should be encouraged to commit to memory notable passages both 
in verse and in prose. As an aid to literary appreciation he is fur- 
ther advised to acquaint himself with the most important facts in 
the lives of the authors whose works he reads and with their place 

3 



34 Meredith College 

in literary history. He should read the books carefully, but his 
attention should not be so fixed upon details that he fails to appreci- 
ate the main purpose and charm of what he reads. 

A few of these books should be read with special care, greater 
stress being laid upon form and style, the exact meaning of words 
and phrases, and the understanding of allusions. 

A. Boohs for Reading. 

The books provided for reading are arranged in the following 
groups, from each of which at least two selections are to be 
made, except that for any book in Group I a book from any 
other group may be substituted. 

Group I. Classics in Translation: The Old Testament, at 
least the chief narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, 
Judges, Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, together with the books of 
Ruth and Esther. 

The Odyssey with the omission, if desired, of Books I-V, XV, 
and XVI. 

The Mneid. 

(The Odyssey, Iliad, and Mneid should be read in English 
translations of recognized literary excellence.) 

Group II. Drama: Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice, As You 
Like It, Julius C&sar. 

Group III. Prose Fiction: Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities; 
George Eliot, Silas Marner; Scott, Quentin Durward; Haw- 
thorne, The House of Seven Gables. 

Group IV. Essays, Biography, etc.: Addison and Steele, The 
Sir Roger de Coverley Papers; Irving, The Sketch Book (selec- 
tions covering about 175 pages) ; Macaulay, Lord Olive; Park- 
man, The Oregon Trail. 

Group V. Poetry: Tennyson, The Coming of Arthur, Gareth 
and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, The Passing of Arthur; 
Browning, Cavalier Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They Brought 
the Good News from Ghent to Aix, Home Thoughts from 
Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of the French 
Camp, Herve Riel, Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up at a 



Admission 35 

Villa — Down in the City, The Italian in England, The Patriot, 
The Pied Piper, "De Gustibus — ," Instans Tyrannus; Scott, 
The Lady of the hake; Coleridge, The Ancient Mariner, and 
Arnold, Sohrab and Rustum. 

B. Boohs for Study. 

The books provided for study are arranged in four groups, 
from each of which one selection is to be made. 

Group I. Drama: Shakespeare, Macbeth, Hamlet. 

Group II. Poetry: Milton, U Allegro, II Penseroso, Comus; 
the selections from Book IV of Palgrave's Golden Treasury, 
First Series, with special attention to Wordsworth, Keats, and 
Shelley. 

Group III. Oratory: Burke, Speech on Conciliation with 
America, Washington's Farewell Address, Webster's First 
Bunker Hill Oration and Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. 

Group IV. Essays: Macaulay, Life of Johnson; Carlyle, 
Essay on Burns, with a brief selection from Burn's Poems. 

N. B. — The four masterpieces selected for careful study should 
take up the whole time devoted to literature in the eleventh grade. 

FRENCH (2 units)* 

FIRST-YEAR FRENCH (1 UNIT) 

A. Careful drill in pronunciation; F'raser and Squair, French 
Grammar, Part I (or its equivalent) ; reading of 150-200 pages of 
easy French. For suggested texts for reading, see Elementary 
French A, page 63. 

SECOND-YEAR FRENCH (1 UNIT) 

B. Fraser and Squair, French Grammar, Part II; reading of 300- 
400 pages of French. For suggested texts for reading, see Elemen- 
tary French B, page 63. 



9B Meredith College 

GERMAN (2 units)* 

FIRST-YEAR GERMAN (1 UNIT) 

A. Drill in pronunciation; Paul V. Bacon, German Grammar, Part 
I, and thirty-six lessons in Part II (or its equivalent). One whole 
year's work. 

SECOND- YEAR GERMAN (1 UNIT) 

B. Paul V. Bacon, German Grammar, finished (or its equivalent) ; 
reading of 300-400 pages of German. For suggested reading texts, 
see Elementary German B, page 66. One whole year's work. 

LATIN (4 units)* 

FIRST-YEAR LATIN (1 UNIT) 

(1) A thorough knowledge of forms and principles of syntax. 
D'Ooge, Latin for Beginners is recommended. 

SECOND-YEAR LATIN (1 UNIT) 

(2) Caesar, four books. Grammar and constant practice in writing 
easy Latin sentences illustrating rules of syntax. 

THIRD-YEAR LATIN (1 UNIT) 

(3) Cicero, six orations, including the Manilian Law. Grammar, 
Allen and Greenough recommended. At least one period a week 
should be devoted to prose composition. Baker and Inglis, High 
School Course in Latin Composition, Part II, is recommended. 

FOURTH-YEAR LATIN (1 UNIT) 

(4) Virgil, JEneid, six books. Study of meter and style. Prose 
composition, one period a week. Baker and Inglis, Part III. 



* Instead of four units in Latin, three units in Latin and two units of French or 
German may be offered. If four units of Latin are presented, French or German 
may be offered as elective units; however, no single unit in any foreign language 
will be accepted unless work in that language is continued. 



Admission 37 



HISTORY (Elective) 

All candidates for credit in history should do considerable work in 
addition to the text-book preparation. The text-book should contain 
not less than five hundred pages, and the work on special topics 
from fuller accounts in the school library should cover at least four 
hundred pages more. 

The candidate may offer as many as three of the following units 
in history: 

Ancient History to 800 A.D. (1 unit). 

Mediaeval and Modern European History (1 unit). 

English History (1 unit). 

American History, with the elements of Civil Government (1 unit) 
or 

Robinson and Breasted, Outlines of European History, Part I, 
from ancient times to the eighteenth century (1 unit). 

Robinson and Beard, Outlines of European History, Part II, from 
the eighteenth century to the present day (1 unit). 

These two books follow the recommendation of the Committee 
of Five of the American Historical Association, and of the Report on 
Social Studies in Secondary Education for 1916, No. 28, published 
in the United States Bulletin of Education. Schools are strongly 
urged to adopt these books for a two-years' course in history. 

ANCIENT HISTORY (1 UNIT) 

Text-books.* — Breasted, Ancient Times (Ginn & Co.) ; West, An- 
cient World, Revised Edition (Allyn and Bacon); Westermann, The 
Story of the Ancient Nations (D. Appleton) ; or an equivalent. 

The following books are suggested for a school library for sup- 
plementary work: Evelyn Abbott, Pericles; Botsford, History of 
Greece; Botsford, History of Rome; Botsford, Story of Rome; Bul- 
finch, Age of Faole; J. S. White, The Boys' and Girls' Herodotus; 
Cox, Tales of Ancient Greece; Davis, Readings in Ancient History; 
Firth, Augustus Ccesar; Fling, Source Booh of Greek History; 
Froude, Ccesar, a Sketch; How and Leigh, A History of Rome; 
Munro, Source Book of Roman History; Pelham, Outlines of Roman 
History; Trollope, The Life of Cicero; Webster, Readings in Ancient 
History; Wheeler, Alexander the Great; and Ginn & Co., Classical 
Atlas. 



Any one text-book of the group is accepted. 



98 Meredith College 

MEDIEVAL AND MODERN HISTORY (1 UNIT) 

Text-books.* — Harding, New Mediaeval and Modem History 
(American Book Co.); Robinson, Mediceval and Modern Times 
(Ginn & Co.); West, The Modern World (Allyn and Bacon); or an 
equivalent. 

The following books are suggested for a school library for supple- 
mentary work: Emerton, Introduction to the Middle Ages; Emerton, 
Mediceval Europe; Dawson, The Evolution of Modern Germany; 
Day, A History of Commerce; Hayes, A Political and Social History 
of Modern Europe (two volumes); Hazen, Europe Since 1815; Hen- 
derson, Historical Documents; Johnston, Napoleon; Ogg, The Gov- 
ernments of Europe; Robinson, Readings in European History (two- 
volume edition) ; Symonds, Short History of the Renaissance; and 
Dow, Atlas of European History. 

ENGLISH HISTORY (1 UNIT) 

Text-books.* — Cheyney, A Short History of England (Ginn & 
Co.) ; Walker, Essentials in English History (American Book Co.) ; 
or an equivalent. 

The following books are suggested for a school library for supple- 
mentary work: Bates and Coman, English History Told by English 
Poets; Beard, Introduction to the English Historians; Bright 
History of England (four volumes) ; Cheyney, Industrial History of 
England; Cheyney, Readings in English History; Cross, A History 
of England and Greater Britain; Gardiner, Student's History of 
England; Gibbons, The Industrial History of England; Green, A 
Short History of the English People; Hayes, British Social Prob- 
lems; Montague, Elements of English Constitutional History; Tout, 
A History of Great Britain; Tuell and Hatch, Selected Readings in 
English History; and Gardiner, School Atlas of English History* 
Low and Pulling, Dictionary of English History (Cassell). 

AMERICAN HISTORY (1 UNIT) 

Text-books. f — Adams and Trent, History of the United States* 
(Allyn and Bacon) ; Ashley, American History, Revised Edition 
(Macmillan) ; Johnson, High School History of the United States, 



* Any one text-book of the group is accepted. 

t A book on Civil Government alone will not take the place of one on American 
History. 



Admission 39 

Revised Edition (Holt) ; Ashley, American Government, Revised 
Edition (Macmillan) ; Beard, American Citizenship ; or an equiva- 
lent. 

The following books are suggested for a school library for supple- 
mentary work: The American Nation (Harpers, twenty-seven vol- 
umes. Get especially volumes 22, 23, 24, 25, which cover the period 
since 1865); Bassett, A Short History of the United States; Coman, 
Industrial History of the United States; Beard, American Govern- 
ment and Politics; Dewey, Financial History of the United States; 
Epochs of American History, Revised Edition (three volumes) ; 
Fiske, The American Revolution (two volumes) ; Fiske, The Critical 
Period; Hart, American History Told by Contemporaries (four vol- 
umes); Johnston, American Politics, Revised Edition; The River- 
side History of the United States (four volumes) ; Statistical Ab- 
stract of the United States; World Almanac; Jameson, Dictionary of 
United States History, and McCoun, Historical Geography of the 
United States. 

MATHEMATICS (2.5 units)! 
ALGEBRA (1.5 UNITS) 

The requirements in algebra include the following subjects: the 
four fundamental operations of algebra, powers and roots, factors, 
common divisors and multiples, fractions, ratio and proportion, in- 
equalities, exponents, equations of the first and second degrees with 
one or more unknown quantities, radicals and equations involving 
radicals, arithmetical and geometrical progressions, binomial theo- 
rem for positive integral exponents. 

Pupils should be required throughout the course to solve 
numerous problems which involve putting questions into equations. 
It is also expected that the work be accompanied by graphical 
methods in the solution of equations of all types. 

It will require at least one and one-half years with four or five 
one-hour recitation periods a week to complete this work. 

PLANE GEOMETRY (1 UNIT) 

The usual theorems and problems of some good text-book in plane 
geometry, together with a sufficient number of original problems to 
enable the student to solve such problems readily and accurately. 

To be acceptable, the work in plane geometry must cover a full 
year with four or five one-hour recitation periods a week. 



t An additional half-unit in algebra may be counted towards entrance if suffi- 
cient time has been given to the subject. No more than two units will be given 
in any case. 



40 Meredith College 

BIBLE (Elective) 

A. Bible Study. 

B. Sunday School Pedagogy J>(1 Unit) 

C. Mission Study 

A. Bible Study. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

1. The Bible Section of the Normal Manual — sixteen to twenty 
lessons. This is to serve as an introduction to the study of the 
Bible. 

2. The Old Testament — forty lessons. 

a. McLear, Old Testament History, abridged edition. 

b. Readings in the historical books. These will be as- 

signed by the teacher and will average one chapter 
for each lesson. 

c. Readings in the Prophets, Isaiah, Chapters 5, 6, 53, 60, 

61; the following books: Amos, Nahum, Haggi, 
Malachi. 

d. Readings in the poetical books, Job 28; Psalms 1, 2, 8, 

19, 22, 29, 51, 84, 90, 103, 119, 137, 147, 148; Proverbs 
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 20, 31; Ecclesiastes 11: 9-12: 14. 

3. The New Testament — forty lessons. 

a. McLear, New Testament History, abridged edition. 

b. Kerr, Harmony of the Gospels — the analysis and 

enough of the text to get a connected view of the 
life of Jesus from the New Testament itself. 

c. The Acts of the Apostles. 

d. One from each of the four groups of Paul's Epistles as 

follows: I Thessalonians, Galatians, Colossians, II 
Timothy. 

e. The Epistle to the Hebrews. 

f. First Epistle of John. 

B. Sunday School Pedagogy. 

One hour a week throughout the year in the study of the New 
Normal Manual — Divisions I and II. If all the time is not 
needed, it can be used in the Bible work. 



Admission 41 



C. Missions. 



One hour a week throughout the year. The following books 
are to be used: 

a. State Missions: L. Johnson, Christian Statesmanship. 

o. Home Missions: V. I. Masters, Baptist Home Missions. 

c. Foreign Missions: T. B. Ray, Southern Baptist Foreign 
Missions. 

Christian Statesmanship must be taken, and either one of the 
others. 

SCIENCE (Elective) 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE (y 2 UNIT OR 1 UNIT)* 

The candidate must be familiar with the general structure of the 
body, digestion, circulation, respiration, and the nervous system. 

Text. — Fitz, Physiology and Hygiene, or Martin, The Human 
Body, Briefer Course, fifth edition revised by G. W. Fitz, M.D. 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (y 2 UNIT OR 1 UNIT)* 

This course should include a detailed study of the land forms and 
physiographic factors. The course will require at least one year. 
Text. — R. S. Tarr, New Physical Geography. 

PHYSICS (y 2 UNIT OR 1 UNIT) 

One year's work, including the principles of mechanics, heat, elec- 
tricity, sound, and light. About one-third of the time is given to 
individual laboratory work, which is reported in carefully prepared 
note-books. 

In order to get full credit the candidate must submit her labora- 
tory note-book which has been certified by her teacher. 

Text. — Coleman, Elements of Physics. 

BOTANY (y 2 UNIT OR 1 UNIT) 

The student should acquire a knowledge of plant structure and 
development; a knowledge of the fundamental pirnciples of plant 
nutrition, assimilation, growth, and reproduction; and a knowledge 
of the relations of plants to other living things. A large part of 



* A student "who has not had the equivalent of four one-hour recitations a week 
throughout the school year in Physiology or Physical Geography will not be given 
full credit for that subject. The maximum credit allowed for Physiology and Physi- 
cal Geography is one and one-half units. 



42 Meredith College 

this information should be gained by laboratory and field work. In 
order to get full credit the candidate must submit her laboratory 
note-books. 

CHEMISTRY (y 2 UNIT OR 1 UNIT) 

This course should include the general laws and theories of Chem- 
istry and make the student familiar with the occurrence, prepara- 
tion, and properties of the common elements and their compounds. 
The candidate must submit her laboratory note-book which has been 
certified by her teacher. 

GENERAL SCIENCE (y 2 UNIT OR 1 UNIT) 

This course should serve as an introduction to the study of the 
various branches of science, and should be based on some standard 
text. A full unit will not be allowed for this course unless the 
student submits a laboratory note-book which has been certified by 
her teacher. 

COOKING (% UNIT OR 1 UNIT) 

A full unit in Cooking will not be given unless a note-book, certi- 
fied by the teacher, is presented. A half-unit or a unit in this sub- 
ject will be allowed according to the time given to it. Two double 
laboratory periods will count for two recitations. 



Requirements for Graduation 

To be entitled to a degree or diploma, the student must, dur- 
ing her college course, prove herself to be of worthy character 
and must complete in a satisfactory way the course of work pre- 
scribed for the degree or diploma in the school from which she 
wishes to graduate. 

Any subject counted toward one degree or diploma may also 
be counted toward a second degree or diploma, provided that 
that subject is one of the prescribed or elective subjects for 
such second degree or diploma. 

Underclassmen and juniors are required to take not less than 
fifteen hours of work a week. Seniors are not required to take 
more than the number of hours necessary to obtain their de- 
grees. No student may take more than sixteen hours of work 
a week except by action of the academic council. 

The maximum number of hours of credit that will be allowed 
during any session is eighteen. 

A student wishing to make up work under a tutor must con- 
sult the dean at the time she arranges her regular work. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred are Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of 
Science. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

To be entitled to the degree of A.B. the candidate must com- 
plete, in addition to fifteen entrance units, sixty hours of work. 
Of the sixty hours required for the degree thirty-one are pre- 
scribed, fifteen are chosen from one of the groups of majors 
and minors, and fourteen are free electives. (Page 47.) 

On the satisfactory completion of the sixty hours of work 
under the conditions prescribed, the student will be recommended 
for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 



44 Meredith College 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

To be entitled to the degree of B.S. the student must com- 
plete the forty-five and one-half hours of prescribed work, and 
in addition, fourteen and one-half hours of elective work. 

On the satisfactory completion of the sixty hours of work 
under the conditions prescribed the student will be recommended 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



General Regulations for Academic Work 



Credits 

At least one year's work must be taken in every department 
in which the student wishes credit toward a degree or diploma, 
or else she must be examined on these subjects. Credit will 
not be given on subjects running through the year unless the 
full year's work is completed. 



Reports 

At the end of each semester a report is sent to the parent or 
guardian of the student, showing her grade of scholarship and 
number of absences from recitation and other college duties. 

At the close of the first and third quarters students are noti- 
fied if they are not making satisfactory grades. 

The grade of scholarship is reported in letters. A, B, C, and 
D indicate passing grades ; E indicates a condition, and F indi- 
cates failure and that the subject must be repeated in class. 



General Regulations for Academic Work 45 

Conditions and Deficiencies 

A student who fails or is deficient in any respect on the work 
of the first semester will be allowed to pass off the condition 
on the first Monday in May. If she fails at this time she will 
be allowed to take another examination on Wednesday, the open- 
ing day of the next fall semester. If she fails a second time, 
she will be required to repeat the semester's work in class. 

A student who fails or is deficient in any respect on the work 
of the second semester will be allowed to pass off the condition 
on the Tuesday immediately preceding the opening of the fall 
semester. If she fails at this time she will be allowed to take 
another examination the second Monday of the next December. 
If she fails a second time she will be required to repeat the 
semester's work in class. 

Examinations for removing entrance conditions will be given 
on Wednesday, the opening day of the fall semester, or the 
second Monday in December, or the first Monday in May. 

All entrance conditions must be removed by the end of the 
sophomore year. No student will receive credit for work in any 
subject until her conditions or deficiencies in that subject are 
removed. 

No student will be allowed an examination on other dates 
than those arranged above until she shall have shown good 
reason for it and paid to the bursar one dollar for the library 
fund. In the case of conflict with other college duties or illness 
this fee will be remitted. 



Outline of Course for the A.B. Degree 

Freshman Year 

Credit 
Subject Hours Page 



English Composit 


ion 1 




.... 3 


(61) 


Latin 




.... 3 


(71) 


Mathematics 1 




.... 4 


(73) 


♦Chemistry 1 


•> 




(54) 


fFrench 






(63) 


fGerman 






(65) 


t Greek 




L. 6 


(73) 


♦History 1 






(67) 


t Spanish 






(80) 


Education or Religious Education 

- 




(55, 76) 


Sophomore 


Tear 






English Literature 1 




.... 3 


(62) 


Biology 




3 


(52) 
(54) 


♦Chemistry 1 ^ 






fFrench 








(63) 


fGerman 








(73) 


t Greek 






6 


(71) 
(67) 


fLatin 








♦History 1 








(80) 


t Spanish 










Electives 




.... 3 





Junior Tear 

Psychology 1% (57) 

Ethics or Sociology iy 2 (79) 

Electives 12 

Senior Tear 

Electives 14 



* Chemistry 1, Biology 2, and History 1 must be completed by the end of the 
junior year. 

t Students must continue for one year the language or languages offered for 
entrance. At least one language that was offered for entrance must be continued 
for two years in college. 

At least two years of work, including the work accepted for entrance, must be 
done in every language counting toward entrance or toward a degree. 



Outline Course for A.B. Degree 47 

The electives must be distributed as follows: (1) A major 
subject of not less than nine hours in one department; (2) A 
minor subject of not less than six hours in one department; 
(3) Free electives of not less than fourteen hours or enough to 
make a total of sixty hours. The choice of the major subject 
must be made by the end of the sophomore year and all elec- 
tives must be approved by the head of the department in which 
the student elects her major subject. 

Major courses may be selected in any one of the following 
departments: (1) Education, (2) English, (3) French, (4) 
German, (5) History, (6) Latin, (7) Mathematics, (8) Re- 
ligious Education, (9) Science. 

Minor courses may be selected in any one of the departments 
that offers major courses or in the department of Greek or 
Spanish. 

Free electives may include any subject offered as a major or 
a minor, not previously included in the major or minor course, 
or may include Cooking, Geology, Household Management, Art 
History, Art Education, or Theoretical course in Music. 



Outline of Course for the B.S. Degree 
in Home Economics 



Freshman Tear 

Credit 
Subject Hours Page 

Chemistry 1 3 (54) 

English Composition 1 3 (61) 

*French 



♦German 
*Greek 
♦Latin 
♦Spanish 



♦Greek 
♦Latin 
♦Spanish 



Total 15 



(64) 
(66) 
(73) 
(71) 
(80) 



Mathematics 4 (73) 

Physiology (Elementary) 1% (52) 

fElective (2d semester) 1% 

Total 16 

Sophomore Tear 

Biology 3 (52) 

Chemistry 2 3 (54) 

Cooking 1 3 (69) 

English Literature 1 3 (62) 

♦French 
♦German 



(64) 
(66) 
(73) 
(71) 

(80) 



* One of the languages offered for entrance must be continued for at least two 
years. 

t A.B. required subjects or electives not already taken. 



Outline Course in Home Economics 49 

Junior Tear 

Credit 

Subject Hours Page 

History 1 3 (67) 

Household Management 2 (70) 

Physics 3 (75) 

Psychology iy 2 (57) 

Bible L (76) 

Education.) iy 2 (55) 

Ethics I (79) 

fElective 4 

Total 15 

Senior Tear 

Cooking 2 1% (69) 

Dietetics 1% (70) 

I 

fElective 9 



Economics ) (69) 

Education \ 3 (55) 



Total 14 



t A.B. required subjects or electives not already taken. 



50 



Meredith College 



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Chemistry 1 (a) 
Education 41.' i 
English Com. L (a) 
Eng. Lit. 1 (a), (b) 
French B (a), (b) 
German 1 
Mathematics 1 (a) 
Physiology (El.)j 
Psychology 


Chemistry 1 (b) 
Chemistry 4 
Economics 
Education 33, 44 
French B (c) 
French 1 (a) 
French 2 
Latin 1 (b) 


English Com. 1 (c) 
French A 
German A 
History 5 
Latin 
Latin 6 
Mathematics 5 
Physiology (Adv.) 
Religious Ed. 1 


«4 

3 


Biology 

English Comp. 2 
French B (a), (b) 
History 6 
Mathematics 1 (a) 
Religious Ed. 5 


Education 20, 21 
English Comp. 1(b) 
English Lit. L (b) 
French B (c) 
History 1 (a) 
Latin 1 (a) 
Mathematics 3 
Physics 
Religious Ed. 11 


Dietetics 
Education 31 
English Lit. 2 
French A 
German A 
History 3 
Latin 

Mathematics 2 
Religious Ed. 9 


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Chemistry 1 (a) 
Education 41 
English Comp. L (a) 
EnglishLit.L(a) 
German 1 
Physiology (E.) 
Psychology 


Chemistry 1 (b) 
Cooking 1 
Economics 
Education 33, 44 
French 1 (a) 
French 2 
Latin 1 (b) 
Religious Ed. 8 


English Comp. 1 (c) 
History 5 
Latin 1 (c) 
Mathematics 5 
Physiology (Adv.) 
Religious Ed. 1 


51 

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Biology 

French B (a), (b) 
History 6 
Latin 

Mathematics 1 (a) 
Religious Ed. 5 


Chemistry 4 
Education 20, 21 
English Comp. 1 (b) 
English Lit. 1 (b) 
French B (c) 
History 1 (a) 
Latin 1 (a) 
Mathematics 3 
Physics 
Religious Ed. 11 


Dietetios 
Education 31 
English Lit. 2 
French A 
German A 
History 3 
Latin 
Mathematics 2 
Religious Ed. 9 


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Chemistry 1 (a) 
Education 41 
English Comp. 1 (a) 
English Lit. 1(a) 
French B (a), (b) 
German 1 
Mathematics 1 (a) 
Physiology (El.) 
Psychology 


Chemistry 1 (b) 
Economics 
Education 
French B (c) 
French 1 (a) 
French 2 
Latin 1 (b) 
Religious Ed. 7 


Cooking 2 
English Comp. 1 (c) 
English Lit. 2 
French A 
German A 
History 5 
Latin 
Latin 1 (c) 
Mathematics 5 
Physiology (Adv.) 
Religious Ed. 1 


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English Lit. 1 (b) 
History 1 (a) 
Latin 1 (a) 
Mathematics 
Physics 
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Dietetics 
English Lit. 2 
History 3 
Mathematics 2 
Religious Ed. 9 




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Schedule of Recitations 



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Education 10, 11,40 
French A (c) 
French 3 
Latin 2 
Spanish A 


English Com. 1 (e) 
English Lit. 1 (c) 
History 1 (d) 
Mathematics 1 (c) 
Spanish B 


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History 1 (b) 
Latin 1 (c) 
Mathematics 1 (b) 
Spanish A 


Art History 1 
Chemistry 1 (c) 
EnglishComp. 1(d) 
History 1 (c) 
Mathematics 1 (c) 
Spanish B 


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Latin 2 
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English Lit. 1 (c) 
History 1 (d) 


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Spanish B 


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Courses of Instruction 

I. Biology 

Julia Moesel Haber, Professor. 
Dr. Elizabeth Delia Dixon Carroll, Professor of 
Physiology and Hygiene. 

1. Elementary Physiology and Hygiene. 

Required of B.S. freshmen. Three hours a week for the first 
semester. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9. 

This course includes a study of the general structure of the body, 
digestion, circulation, respiration, and the nervous system. 

Text. — Martin, Human Body, Briefer Course. 

2. General Biology. 

Required of sophomores and open to other college students. 
Three hours a week for a year. Two hours lecture and reci- 
tation and four hours laboratory. Lectures: Wednesday, Fri- 
day, 9:00. Laboratory: Sec. (a), Monday, 1:30-3:30, and 
Thursday, 2:30-4:30; Sec. (&), Tuesday, Friday, 2:30-4:30; 
Sec. (c), Wednesday, Saturday, 2:30-4:30. 

This course during the first semester includes a detailed study of 
protoplasm and cell structure as exemplified by animal life. The 
earthworm is chosen as a representative animal, and its varied sys- 
tems of organs are considered. The general subject of animal physi- 
ology is introduced and the variation in structure of the different 
systems of organs is emphasized. 

During the second semester protoplasm and cell structure found 
in plant life are studied and the distinguishing features are noted. 
A representative plant, such as the fern, is chosen and the cell struc- 
ture of its various tissues considered. The general subject of plant 
physiology is introduced and the vegetal and reproductive processes 
in various plants considered. During the closing weeks of the year 
classification of both animal and plant life is emphasized and studied 
by means of numerous field trips. 

Laboratory fee, $2.50. 



Courses of Instruction 53 

3. Physiology and Hygiene, Advanced. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for a year. 
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 11. 

First semester. Physiology: The general structure and composi- 
tion of the human body; the nervous system; digestive, circulatory, 
and respiratory systems; secretion and excretion; blood and lymph; 
reproduction. 

Second semester. Hygiene: The course includes the subjects of 
exercise, bathing, clothing, etc.; contagion and infection; disinfec- 
tion; the hygienic arrangement of the sick room. 

A course is given in "First Aid" as arranged by the American 
Red Cross. Those who pass the examination in this course will 
De given a 'Certificate from the American Red Cross. 

Text and Reference Books. — Kirk, Handbook of Physiology; 
Flint, Human Body; Martin, Human Body; Schaffer and Flint, 
American Text-oooTc of Physiology ; Gray, Anatomy. 

3. Botany. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for the 
first semester. 

A study of Botany, including morphology and physiology of all 
groups of the plant kingdom. Considerable time will be given to 
the analysis and classification of plants. 



4. Zoology. 



Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for the 
second semester. 

A study of representatives of all the groups of the animal kingdom 
-and a comparative study of vertebrates. 



54 Meredith dollege 

II. Chemistry 

Lula Gaines Winston, Professor. 

Lucketia Douglas Baker, Associate Professor. 

1. General Chemistry. 

Required of freshmen. Three hours a week for a year. Three 
hours lecture and recitation a week, and four hours labora- 
tory. Lectures: Sec. (a) Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9; 
Sec. (&) Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 10; Sec. (c) Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 1:30. Laboratory: Sec. (a) Monday, 
Thursday, 2:30-4:30. Sec. (&) Tuesday, Friday, 2:30-4:30. 
Sec. (c) Wednesday, Saturday, 2:30-4:30. Sec. (d) Wednes- 
day, Friday, 11:00-1:00. 

This course includes a study of the occurrence, preparation, and 
properties of important metallic and nonmetallic elements and com- 
pounds. The historical development of the subject is traced, and 
the fundamental principles of Chemistry are discussed as far as pos- 
sible. Special emphasis is laid upon the practical application of the 
science to daily life. 

The laboratory exercises are devoted to the preparation and study 
of certain important elements and compounds. 
Laboratory fee, $5. 

2. Organic Chemistry. 

Required of sophomores in the B.S. course. Open to other 
students who have completed Chemistry 1. Three hours a 
week for a year. Lectures: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 12. 
Laboratory: Monday, Thursday, 2:30-4:30. 

The lectures are taken up with the study of the hydrocarbons and 
their derivatives, including such substances as are of interest and 
importance, as ether, alcohol, vinegar, glycerine, fats, soaps, sugar, 
starch, etc. The laboratory periods for the first semester are given 
to exercises in qualitative analysis, while the remainder of the year 
is devoted to organic preparations. 

Laboratory fee, $5. 



Courses of Instruction 55 

3. Quantitative Analysis. 

Open to students who have completed Chemistry 1 and 2. 
Six hours of laboratory work a week for a year. Elective in 
the A.B. and B.S. courses, two hours credit. 

The year is devoted to the study of standard gravimetric and 
volumetric methods of estimating the common bases and acids. 

4. Applied Chemistry. 

Open to students who have completed Chemistry 1 and 2. 
Two hours a week for fall semester. Elective in the A.B. 
and B.S. courses, one hour credit. 

This is an introduction to the study of commercial methods of 
manufacturing chemical products, the sources of raw materials, and 
the equipment required. 

5. History of Chemistry. 

Open to students who have completed Chemistry 1 and 2. 
Two hours a week for spring semester. Elective in the A.B. 
and B.S. courses, one hour credit. 

This course is intended to give a general view of the development 
of the science of Chemistry, together with brief biographical 
sketches of the leading workers in this field of study. 

III. Education and Psychology 

Edwin McKoy Highsmith, Professor. 

Evelyn Mildred Campbell, Associate Professor. 

The courses in this department are intended primarily for stu- 
dents who are preparing to teach. They have been so worked out 
that students properly electing work become eligible for full profes- 
sional certification in North Carolina. 

All courses listed count toward the professional certificates. 

Students will be required to adhere strictly to their classification 
status in registering for courses in this department. 



56 Meredith College 

10. Elementary Psychology. 

Elective for freshmen. Three hours a week for the first 
semester. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 12. 

Miss Campbell. 

The attempt is to give students a working grasp of the more 
important bases of understanding the mental background to human 
behavior. Constant reference is made to applying the ideas de- 
veloped to teaching situations. 

Readings, Reports, Discussions, Notes. 

Text. — LaRue, Psychology for Teachers. 

11. Special Methods. 

Elective for freshman. Three hours a week for the second 
semester. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 12. 

Miss Campbell. 

A continuation of Education 10, which is prerequisite. An intro- 
ductory study of the best current methods of presenting the usual 
elementary school subjects. 

Readings, Reports, Discussions, Notes. 

Text. — Charters, Teaching the Common Branches. 

20. Public Education in the United States. 

Elective for sophomores. Three hours a week for the first 
semester. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10. 

Mr. Highsmith. 

A survey of the growth of public education in the United States 
with a study of current problems in the organization, administra- 
tion and development of the State Educational agencies operative 
today. 

Readings, Problems, Reports, Discussions, Notes. 

Text. — Cubberley, Public Education in the United States. 

21. Introductory Study of Rural Education. 

Elective for sophomores. Three hours a week for the second 
semester. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10, 

Mr. Highsmith. 



Courses of Instruction 57 

Analysis of Rural Life in the United States today; a Study of 
the place of the public school in this Rural life. 
Readings, Reports, Discussions, Notes, Text Study. 

Text. — Cubberley, Rural Life and Education. 

30. General Psychology. 

Required of A.B. and B.S. juniors. Three hours a week for 
the first semester. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9. 

Mr. Eighsmith. 

A study is made of human behavior in its mental bearings. The 
relation of the nervous system to mental life is studied in some 
detail. An introductory course. 

Simple experiments. Parallel readings. 

Reports, Class Discussions, Notes. 

Laboratory fee, $5. 

Text. — Breese, Psychology. 

31. Educational Psychology. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite, General Psy- 
chology. Three hours a week for the first semester. Mon- 
day, Wednesday, Friday, 11. 

Mr. Highsmith. 

Careful study of the learning process. The principles set forth 
are developed primarily from experiments and laboratory work. 
Teaching applications are deduced. 

Parallel readings. Reports, Discussions. Full Notes. 

Laboratory fee, including Text, $2.50. 

33. Child Study. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: General Psy- 
chology. Three hours a week for the second semester. 
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 10. 

Mr. Highsmith. 

Hereditary forces operative in the life of a child. Physical de- 
velopment of children. Stages in their mental development. Inter- 
relations of child's physical and mental growth. Moral develop- 
ment and training. Practical bearings of ideas and principles as 
formulated. 



58 Meredith College 

Readings, Reports. Class Discussions. Notes. 

Text. — Norsworthy and Whitley, Psychology of Childhood. 

40. History of Education. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for 
the first semester. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 12. 

Mr. Highsmith. 

The effort is to equip students to understand the hearing of the 
History of Education on current practices and problems in the field 
of Education. From this viewpoint some guiding constructive prin- 
ciples of education are developed. 

Readings, Reports, Problems, Discussions, Notes. 

Text. — Cubberley, The History of Education. 

41. Methods of Studying and Methods of Teaching How to 

Study. 
Elective for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: General Psy- 
chology. Three hours a week for the second semester. Tues- 
day, Thursday, Saturday, 9. 

Mr. Highsmith. 

A course in Applied Psychology. Students investigate the meth- 
ods of study that have been proved most economical and sound. 
Devices and technique for teaching elementary and high school 
students how to study are worked out in some detail. 

Notes, Class Discussions, Readings, Reports. 

Text. — McMurry, How to Study. 

42. School Hygiene. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for 
the first semester. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 12. 

Mr. Highsmith. 

The course sets up ideal and practical standards in reference to 
location and equipment of school sites and buildings, for conserva- 
tion of health and energy of school children. Medical inspection; 
school-room lighting and ventilation; the hygiene of instruction; 
these and related topics make up the basis of discussion. 

Readings, Reports, Problems, Discussions, Notes. 

Text. — Dresslar, School Hygiene. 



Courses of Instruction 59 

43. Educational Measurements. Mental Measurements. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: General Psy- 
chology. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 12. 

Mr. Highsmith. 

The courses in Educational Measurements and in Mental Measure- 
ments will be given in alternate years. The one in Educational 
Measurements will be given in 1921-22. A study of the derivation, 
application, scoring, and uses of these tests. Elementary Statistical 
methods sufficient for understanding above topics in a practical way. 
Tests studied and administered as part of term's work. 

Readings, Discussions, Notes. 

Laboratory fee, $1.50. 

Text. — Monroe, DeVoss and Kelly, Educational Tests and Measure- 
ments. 

44. School and Classroom Management. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite or parallel: 
General Psychology. Three hours a week for the first semes- 
ter. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 10. 

Mr. Highsmith. 

A study of the management problems the modern teacher meets 
in attempting to realize the specific aims of her work. Involves a 
statement of these aims, and of the means at hand for their realiza- 
tion. Much parallel reading is done in finding advanced ideas in 
management on detailed problems the course develops. A critical 
study. 

Notes, Reports, Discussions. 

Text. — Strayer and Englehardt, The Classroom Teacher. 

* [45. Problems in Secondary Education. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: General 
Psychology. Three hours a week for the second semester. 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 11. 

Mr. Highsmith.} 



60 Meredith College 

f [46. Principles of Supervision. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: General 
Psychology. Three hours a week for the first semester. Tues- 
day, Thursday, Saturday, 10. 

Mr. Highsmith.] 

50. Practice Teaching. 

Elective for seniors majoring in Education. Hours and 
credits to be arranged with the Head of Education Depart- 
ment. 

51. Special Methods of Teaching French. 

Elective for seniors. One hour a week for the year. Hour 
of recitation to he arranged. This course is outlined as 
French 4. 

Miss Allen. 

52. Special Methods of Teaching History. 

Elective for seniors. Two hours a week for the first semester. 
Hours of recitation to be arranged. This course is outlined 
as History 6. 

Mr. Riley. 

53. Special Methods of Teaching Home Economics. 

Elective for seniors. Three hours a week for the second 
semester. Hours of recitation to be arranged. This course is 
outlined as Home Economics 6. 

Miss Normington. 

54. Special Methods of Teaching Latin. 

Elective for seniors. One hour a week for a year. Hour of 
recitation to be arranged. This course is outlined as Latin 5. 

Miss Law. 

55. Special Methods of Teaching Mathematics. 

Elective for seniors. Three hours a week for the first semes- 
ter. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 11. This course is out- 
lined as Mathematics 5. 

Mr. Canaday. 



* Not given 1921-1922. Education 31 and 45 given in alternate years. 
t Not given 1921-1922. Education 44 and 46 given in alternate years. 



Courses of Instruction 61 

56. Special Methods of Teaching Public School Music. 

Elective for seniors. One hour a week for two years, Mon- 
day, 10; Thursday, 9. This course is outlined as Music 
Pedagogy 1 and 2. 

Mrs. Ferrell. 

IV. English 

♦Elizabeth Avery Colton, Professor. 

Mary Susan Steele, Associate Professor. 

Avis Leone Kidwell, Associate Professor. 
♦Mary Lynch Johnson, Instructor. 

Carmen Lou Rooers, Instructor. 

Mary Jane Carroll, Instructor. 

English Composition 

1. Introductory Course. 

Required of freshmen. Three hours a week for a year. 
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9, 11, 1:30; Monday, Wednes- 
day, Friday, 10, 1:30. 

Daily and weekly theme writing, with emphasis on exposition. 
Weekly conferences. Study of selected masterpieces of literature. 
Required reading. 

2. Intermediate Course in Expository Writing. 

Required of all juniors who need special drill in structure. 
One hour a week for the first semester. Friday, 9. 

3. Description and Narration. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. One hour a week for the 
first semester. Hour to be arranged. 

The principles of artistic description, and the study of the short 
story. Practice in writing. 



* On leave of absence 1920-1921: Miss Steele, Acting Head of the Department. 



62 Meredith College 

English Literature 

1. Outline History of English Literature. 

Required of sophomores. Three hours a week for a year. 
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9-1:30; Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday, 10. 

The object of this course is to give the student a general survey of 
English literature and to prepare her for more specialized work. 
The course is conducted by lectures and by critical study of selected 
masterpieces. The lectures follow the course outlined in Greenlaw's 
Syllabus of English Literature. Papers, or written reviews, every 
four weeks. 

2. English Drama through Shakspere. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for a year. 
Hours to be arranged. 

This course attempts to trace the development of the drama from 
the Easter Mystery to Shakspere; to observe the structure and 
artistic principles of the Elizabethan drama; and to note the devel- 
opment of Shakspere's art and his place in Elizabethan literature. 
Most of Shakspere's plays are read in chronological order; several 
are studied closely. 

*[3. English Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for a year. 
Wednesday, Friday, 1:30, Saturday, 12. 

Careful study of Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, and 
Browning; selections from Coleridge, Byron, Scott, Landor, Arnold, 
Rossetti, Morris and Swinburne.] 

4. The English Novel. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week throughout 
the year. 

A survey of the development of the novel, beginning with the 
sixteenth century. 

5. An Introductory Course in Literary Criticism. 

Open to seniors. Three hours a week for the second semester. 



* Not given 1921-1922. Given alternate years. 



Courses of Instruction 63 

V. French 

Catherine Allen, Professor. 

Beatrice Mary Teague, Associate Professor. 

Helen F. Epler, Associate Professor. 

Eva Louise Dean, Instructor. 



A. Elementary French. 

A course for those who do not offer French for entrance. 
Four hours a week for a year. Counts one unit or three 
hours. Sec. (a) and (&), Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Satur- 
day, 11: Sec. (c), Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 12. 

Careful drill in phonetics and practice in easy conversational 
idioms. A thorough knowledge of rudiments of grammar, including 
the essentials of syntax with the mastery of the more common 
irregular verbs. The reading of 200 to 300 duodecimo pages of 
graduated texts. The ability to write from dictation easy French 
sentences. 

Bruce's Grammaire Francaise and Fraser and Squair's French 
Grammar are recommended as standard grammars. The texts sug- 
gested for reading are selected from the following: 

Walter-Ballard, Beginner's French: Meras et Roth, Petit Contes 
de Finance; or Guerber, Contes et Legendes; Mairet, La Tdche du 
Petit Pierre; Lavisse, Histoire de France, Cours Elementaire ; Bal- 
lard, Stories for Oral French. 

B. Elementary French. 

Open to those who have completed Elementary French A, or 
who offer one unit of French for entrance. Four hours a 

week for a year. Counts one unit or three hours. Sec. (a) 
and (&), Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 9; Sec. (c), 
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 10. 

Grammar continued. Exercises in Composition dictation and 
conversation. Reading from texts selected from the following: 

Laoiche et Martin. Le Voyage de M. Perrichon; or Augier, Le 
Gendre de M. Poirier; George Sand, La Mare an Diable; Lamar- 
tine, La Revolution Frangaise; Merimee, Colomba; Daudet, Contes 
Choisis; Pattou, Causeries; Frangois French Prose Composition, 
Part I. 



64 Meredith College 

Intermediate French. 

For those who offer four units in Latin. Elementary French 
A and B will be combined and the work completed in one 
year, provided such students can give the time necessary for 
the intensive study required. Fours hours a week. 

1. French Prose of the Nineteenth Century. 

Open to students who have completed French B or who offer 
two units of French for entrance. Three hours a week for a 
year. Sec. (a), Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 10; Sec. (&), 
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 12. 

French will be the language of the classroom. Advanced Gram- 
mar and Composition, conversation, resumes oral and written of 
texts read. 

General survey of the history of French Literature, with especial 
stress upon the eighteenth and nineteenth century literature. The 
works of representative novelists and dramatists of the nineteenth 
century will be studied. 

2. French Drama of the Seventeenth Century. 

Open to those who have completed course 1. Three hours a 
week for a year. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 10. 

Lectures are given on the earlier French drama and the institu- 
tions which have determined the evolution of the classic drama. 

Hotel de Rambouillet. Academie Francaise. Corneille is studied 
in the Cid, Horace, Polyeucte; Moliere in Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, 
Les Precieuses Ridicules, Tartuffe or Le Misanthrope, UAvare; 
Racine in Athalie, Andromaque. 

3. French Poetry. 

Open to those who have completed course 2. Three hours 
a week for a year. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 12. 



Courses of Instruction 65 

The middle ages; the poetry of chivalry, the courtly lyric of the 
fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The sixteenth century, court 
and religious poetry. The seventeenth century, reform in poetry, 
the lyric element in the work of the classic writers. The eighteenth 
century, the end of classicism; the nineteenth century, romantic 
poetry, Parnassian poetry, contemporary poetry. 

4. French Composition and Conversation. 

This course is planned to meet the difficulties of those intend- 
ing to teach French and to render their work more effective. 
Open primarily to seniors who are taking major work in 
French. One hour a week for a year. 

VI. German 

Catharine Allen, Professor. 

A. Elementary German. 

This course is intended to give students an opportunity to 
begin the study of German and to acquire a practical knowl- 
edge of the language. Four hours a week for a year. Counts 
one unit or three hours. Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Satur- 
day, 11. 

Grammar, prose composition, drill in phonetics, reading of short 
stories and plays by modern writers, conversation, dictation. Texts 
will be selected from the following: 

Zinnecker Deutsch fur Aufdnger; Ballard and Krause, Short 
Stories for Oral German; Miiller and Wenckebach, Gliick Auf; 
Storm, Immensee; Wilhelmi, Einer muss heiraten; Anderson, Bilder- 
Quch ohne Bilder; Arnold, Fritz auf Ferien; Thomas, Practical Ger- 
man Grammar. 

B. Elementary German. 

Open to students who have completed one year of German. 
Four hours a week throughout the year. Counts one unit or 
three hours. 
5 



66 Meredith College 

Study of Grammar continued. Reading, prose composition and 
conversation. Themes in simple German are based upon texts read. 
Texts for class study: 

Heyse, UorraMata or Das Madschen von Treppi; Allen Tier 
Deutsche Lustpiele; Hatfield, German Lyrics and Ballads; Hillern, 
Hbher als die Kirche; Wildenbruch. Das Edle Blut; Freitag. Die 
Journalisten. 

Intermediate German. 

For those who offer four units in Latin. Elementary Ger- 
man A and B will he combined and the work completed in one 
year, provided such students can give the time necessary for 
the intensive study required. Four hours a week. 

1. German Literature. 

This course will be conducted in German and presupposes 
a good knowledge of German Grammar and the ability to 
understand simple German. Three hours a week throughout 
the year. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9. 

Introduction to German Literature. Outline of the History of 
German Literature up to and through the classical period. Reading 
of selected dramas and poems of Lessing, Schiller and Goethe, with 
a study of their lives. 

Grammar, composition and conversation continued. 

2. German. 

Goethe's Faust, first semester. Development of the Faust legend. 
Lectures, discussions, papers. Exercises in German syntax. 

Nineteenth Century Literature, second semester. A rapid survey 
of the origin, growth and influence of the chief literary movements 
of the century, such as romanticism, etc. Reading of representative 
works of the most important authors of the period. 

3. German Lyric Poetry. 

Three hours a week. 

Representative German lyric poetry from the early modern period 
Volkslied to the death of Heine, with special reference to the 
Romantic School. 



Courses of Instruction 67 

German conversation. Open only to seniors and juniors. Con- 
versation will toe based on subjects connected with modern Ger- 
many, its life, customs and institutions. The student will have an 
opportunity to acquire fluency and accuracy in the use of the lan- 
guage, a good working vocabulary and much valuable information. 
This course is also intended to anticipate problems which the 
teacher of German is likely to meet. 

VII. History and Economics 

Samuel Gayle Riley, Professor. 



History 



1. European History. 



Required of all students in freshman or sophomore year. 
Three hours a week for a year. Sec. (a), Monday, Wednes- 
day, Friday, 10; Sec. (&), Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 12; 
Sec. (c), Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1:30; Sec. (d), Tues- 
day, Thursday, Saturday, 1:30. 

The course is conducted by means of informal discussions, recita- 
tions, occasional hour examinations, and a final examination at the 
close of each semester. 

Each student is required to keep a loose-leaf note-book and to do 
a large amount of collateral reading. There are one or two special 
papers during the year. Besides the subject-matter of the paper, 
emphasis is placed on the best way to get and arrange historical 
material. 

*[2. English History. 

Open to those who have completed Hitsory 1 or an equivalent. 
Three hours a week for a year. Tuesday, Thursday, Satur- 
day, 11. 

First semester: England from the earliest historic times through 
the Revolution of 168i8-1689. 

Second semester: From William and Mary to the present time. 



68 Meredith College 

The method of work is similar to that of History 1, but more 
advanced. Special emphasis is placed on the relations between Eng- 
land and America.] 

3. Colonial and United States History to 1829. 

Open to A.B. and B.S. seniors. Three hours a week for a year. 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 11. 

As the students have unusual opportunities for study at the State 
Library, much of the work of the class is done there. 



[4. History of the United States since 1829. 

Open to A.B. and B.S. seniors. Three hours a week for a 
year.] 



5. Modern and Contemporary European History. 

Open to those who have completed History 1 or an equivalent. 
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 11. 



First semester: Europe from the Congress of Vienna to 1871. 
Second semester: Recent European History, 1871 to the present 
time. 



6. Teaching of History. 

For seniors majoring in History. Two hours a week for the 
first semester. Hour to be arranged. 



A study of the problems of the history teacher in elementary and 
secondary schools. 

Text-book, Readings, Lectures, and Reports. 



* Not given in 1921-1922. History 3 and 4, and 2 and 5 are given in alter- 
nate years. 



Courses of Instruction 69 

Economics 

1. Principles of Economics. 

Required of B.S. juniors and open to A.B. juniors and seniors. 
Three hours a week for a year. Tuesday, Thursday, Satur- 
day, 10. 

First semester: The rise of modern industry, its expansion in the 
United States; and the principles of production, exchange, distribu- 
tion, and consumption. 

Second semester: The application of economic principles to such 
important problems as money, credit, and banking, the tariff, the 
labor movement, monopolies, railroads, trusts, taxation, and economic 
reform. 

Texts Required. — Seager, Principles of Economics; Hamilton, 
Current Economic Problems. 

VIII. *Home Economics 

Olive L. Normington, Professor. 

Cooking 

1. Cooking. 

Required of sophomores in the B.S. course. Open to other 
college students who have completed Physiology I. One lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods (one of three and one of two 
hours) each week throughout the year. Three hours credit. 
Lecture, Thursday, 10. 

The aim of this course is to give a knowledge of the composition 
and fundamental principles and processes involved in the prepara- 
tion, preservation, and serving of foods, and to develop skill in the 
technique of cookery. 



2. Cooking. 



Elective for juniors and seniors in the B.S. course who have 
completed Chemistry 2 and Cooking 1. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods of two hours each per week. Three hours 
credit. Lecture, Tuesday, 11. 



Maximum credit allowed toward A.B. degree is six hours. 



70 Meredith College 

This is a course in advanced cooking and meal serving. Food 
composition and combinations are studied in connection with the 
planning, preparation, and serving of typical meals. Special atten- 
tion is given to the balancing of foods, the cost, and the various 
conditions affecting food questions. 

3. Cooking. 

Required of seniors in the B.S. course. Open to other stu- 
dents who have completed Cooking 1 and Chemistry 2. One 
lecture and one laboratory period of three hours a week the 
second semester. Five hours of work a week outside of class 
is required. One and one-half hours credit. Lecture, Mon- 
day, 11. 

This course is the summation of the principles studied in Cook- 
ing 1 and Dietetics with the emphasis on the application of the 
principles of food requirements to invalid diet. 

4. Dietetics. 

Required of seniors in the B.S. course. Open to other stu- 
dents who have completed Cooking 1 and Chemistry 2. Three 
hours a week for the first semester. One and one-half hours 
credit. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 11. 

The aim of this course is to give a knowledge of the nutritive 
requirements of the body in health, disease, and under varying con- 
ditions of environment, age, occupation, etc. .Special attention is 
given to the study of a few pathological conditions especially affected 
by diet. 

5. Household Management. 

Required of juniors in the B.S. course. Open to juniors and 
seniors in other courses. Two hours a week for a year. 
Tuesday, Thursday, 12. 

The aim of this course is the application of scientific principles 
to the problems of the modern home maker. The apportionment of 
time and income, the efficient organization and the history of the 
family, and its economic and social relationships are discussed. 



Courses of Instruction 71 

6. Home Economics Teaching. 

Elective for seniors of the B.S. course. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. 

This course is given to prepare Home Economics students for 
teaching. It includes a careful study of the means and methods of 
Home Economics instruction, the equipment of laboratories, and 
plans for practical work. Special instruction is given 'both in the 
science and art of Home Economics. Text-book reading, lectures, 
and practice teaching. 

Sewing 

1. Sewing. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Two laboratory periods of two 
hours each a week throughout the year. No credit is allowed 
for this course. 

This course includes instruction and practice in plain hand and 
machine sewing, the study of textiles, and the use of commercial 
patterns. 

IX. Latin and Greek 

Helen Hull Law, Professor. 

0. Latin. Virgil; Latin Prose Composition. 

This course is designed for those who offer only three units in 
Latin for entrance and counts three hours toward a degree. 

a. Virgil, ^Eneid. Three hours a week for a year. Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 11. 

&. Latin Prose Composition. One hour a week for a year. Satur- 
day, 11. 

Text. — Barss, Writing Latin II. 

1. Livy, Horace; Latin Prose Composition. 

Required of candidates for the A.B. degree. Open to those 
who offer four units of Latin for entrance. Three hours a 
week for a year. 



72 Meredith College 

Sec. (a), Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 10; Sec. (ft), Tues- 
day, Thursday, 11; Friday, 12; Sec. (c), Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday, 10. 

a. Livy, first semester. 

Selections from Books XXI and XXII (Westcott) ; study of Livy's 
style and Livy as a historian. 

Z>. Horace, the second semester. 

Selections from the Odes and Epodes (Smith); History of the 
Augustan age; the life and personality of Horace; metres and 
literary style. 

c. Latin Prose Composition. 

Prepared and sight exercises. 

2. Cicero; Latin Poets. 

Open to those who have completed Latin 1. Two hours a week 
for a year. Thursday, Saturday, 12. 

a. Cicero, Letters selected to show personality of Cicero and the 
life of the times; Be Amicitia; Cicero's views concerning friendship 
compared with those of modern writers. 

o. Latin poetry; selections from the poems of Catullus, Tibullus, 
Propertius, and Ovid; style, metres, development of the Roman 
elegy; Alexandrian school of poetry. 

*[3. Tacitus, Pliny, Horace. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Two hours a week for a year. 
Wednesday, Friday, 9. 

a. First semester: Tacitus, Agricola; Roman biography; study of 
the style of Tacitus. 

Pliny, Letters; Roman life as portrayed by Pliny. 

Martial, Epigrams (Sight reading). 

o. Second semester: Horace, Satires and Epistles; Horace, the 
man, the satirist, the philosopher, the literary critic] 

4. Roman Private Life. Outline History of Latin Literature. 

Open to all who have completed Latin 1. One hour a week 
throughout the year. Tuesday, 12. Lectures and assigned 
reading. 



* Latin 3 and 6 are given in alternate years. Latin 3 will not be given in 
1921-1922. 



Courses of Instruction 73 

5. Latin Prose Composition. 

One hour a week throughout the year. 

Advanced prose composition and study of the principles of Latin 
syntax; methods of teaching Latin in secondary schools. Designed 
especially for those expecting to teach. 

6. Latin Comedy; Yirgil. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Two or three hours a week for 
a year. Monday, Wednesday, 12; Saturday, 11. 

a. First semester: Latin comedy; selected plays of Terence and 
Plautus; Roman theatrical antiquities; origin and development of 
Latin comedy. 

&. Second semester: Virgil, Eclogues, Georgics, and Mneid, Books 
VII-XII. Virgil as the great national poet; his influence on later 
literature. 

Greek 

* 1. Elementary Course. 

Open to all college students. Three hours a week for a year. 
White, First Greek Book; Xenophon; Anabasis. Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 11. 

* 2. Elementary Course continued. 

Open to those who have completed Greek 1. Three hours a 
week for a year. 

Homer, Selections from the Iliad; Plato, Crito, Apology, and 
selections from the Phaedo. 



X , Mathematics 

Ernest F. Canaday, Professor. 

1. Solid Geometry, College Algebra, and Plane Trigonometry. 

Required of freshmen in the A.B. and B.S. courses; open to 
other college students. Four hours a week for a year. Sec. 
(a), Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 9; Sec. (&), 



Greek 1 and 2 given in alternate years. Greek 2 will not be given 1921-1922. 



74 Meredith College 

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 12; Sec. (c), Tuesday,. 
Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 1:30. 

Solid Geometry, complete. 

Text. — Slaught and Lennes, Solid Geometry. 

Advanced Algebra. This work includes complex numbers, per- 
mutations, combinations, determinants, theory of equations, in- 
equalities, and discussion of the binomial theorem for positive 
integral exponents. 

Text. — Fite, College Algedra. 

Plane Trigonometry. — Theory and application of the trigonometric 
functions, trigonometric analysis, graphical representation of the 
trigonometric functions, theory and use of the tables. 

Text. — Wells, New Plane Trigonometry. 

2. Analytic Geometry. 

Open to students who have completed course 1. Three hours 
a week for a year. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 11. Plane 
and (in part) Solid Analytic Geometry. 

Text. — P. F. Smith and A. S. Gale, New Analytic Geometry. 

3. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Open to students who have completed course 2. Three hours 
a week for a year. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 10. 

The fundamental principles of Differential and Integral Calculus 
and their application. 

Text. — Townsend and Goodenough, Essentials of Calculus. 

4. Differential Equations. 

Open to students who have completed course 3. Three hour& 
a week for a year. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 2:30. 

Text. — W. A. Murray, Differential Equations. 

5. The Teaching of Mathematics. (Listed as Education 52.) 

Elective for juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for 
a semester. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 11. 

Text. — To be selected. 



Courses of Instruction 75 

XL Physics and Geology 

J. Gregory Boomhour, Professor. 

1. General Physics. 

Required of juniors in the B.S. course. Elective for other 
college students. Three hours a week. Three hours lecture 
and recitation and two hours laboratory. Lectures, Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 10. 

This course includes a study of the elementary fundamental prin- 
ciples of Physics. The work consists of lectures, class demonstra- 
tions, occasional quizzes, and laboratory work based on Mechanics, 
Sound, Light, Heat, Magnetism, and Electricity. Special attention 
is given to the explanation of the phenomena of everyday life. 

Text. — Black and Davis, Practical Physics. Laboratory Guide: 
Black, Laboratory Manual in Physics. 

2. Advanced Physics. 

Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week for a year. 

A more advanced course in Physics arranged for those who are 
majoring in science. Particular attention is paid to Mechanics, 
Heat, Light, Electricity, and Magnetism, and their varied uses in 
the home and for commercial purposes. 

GEOLOGY 

Open to juniors and seniors. Three hours a week. Hours of 
recitation to be arranged. 

First semester: Dynamical Geology and Physiography. 

This course deals with natural phenomena which affect the earth's 
structure, such as weathering, volcanoes, earthquakes, erosion caused 
by waterways and glaciers; also, the varied changes of topography, 
including the life histories of rivers and lakes. 

Second semester: Structural and Historical Geology. 

In the second semester the earth's structure, and the varied 
changes which have taken place in animal and plant life as revealed 
by fossils, are studied. 

Text. — Le Conte, Elements of Geology. 



76 Meredith College 



XII. Religious Education 

Lemuel Elmer McMillan Freeman, Professor. 
Evelyn Mildred Campbell, Associate Professor. 

1. Old Testament History. 

Open to sophomores. Three hours a week for the first 
ter. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 11. 

This course gives a hrief survey of Old Testament History. It 
aims to give a working knowledge of Old Testament History, to 
show the religious development of the people of Israel, to indicate 
the religious ideals of their great leaders, to discover Israel's con- 
tribution to human progress, and to prepare the pupil to appreciate 
the various forms of Old Testament literature. 

Texts. — Crockett, Harmony of Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles; 
Willett, The Prophets of Israel. 

2. Old Testament Literature. 

Primarily for sophomores and juniors. Three hours a week for 
the second semester. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 11: 

The origin of the Old Testament books and their formation in a 
canon are considered. The collection of Old Testament writings is 
then viewed as a whole in order to get a true perspective of its dif- 
ferent parts. Following this, representative selections are studied 
with a view to appreciating them as literature. 

*[3. The Life of Christ. 

Open to students from all classes. Three hours a week for 
the first semester. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10. 

In this course the life of Jesus Christ is studied historically in the 
light of the political, social, and religious conditions of the time. 
His work and teaching are viewed in their various phases, and an 
effort is made to discover at their sources the influences that re- 
sulted in Christianity as a world religion. 

Texts. — Stevens and Burton, A Harmony of the Gospels; Rhees, 
The Life of Jesus of Nazareth.] 



Not given 1921-1922. 



Courses of Instruction 77 

*[4. History of the Apostolic Age. 

Open to students from all classes. Three hours a week for 
the second semester. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10. 

The course of New Testament History is traced from the death 
of Christ to the close of the first century. The origin of the various 
New Testament writings is noted, especially the conditions that 
called them forth, and the purpose of their writers. The contents 
and teachings of the New Testatment books, except the Gospels, are 
studied. The course aims to provide such introductory background 
as will enable the student to read all parts of the New Testament 
with understanding and appreciation. 

Texts. — Burton, The Records and Letters of the Apostolic Age; 
Purves, The Apostolic Age.] 

5. Old Testament Interpretation. 

Open to students who have taken Bible 1. Two hours a week 
for the first semester. Wednesday, Friday, 9. 

The principles of Biblical interpretation are applied in the study 
of representative books of the Old Testament. 

6. New Testament Interpretation. 

Open to students who have taken Bible 3 and 4. Two hours 
a week for the second semester. Wednesday, Friday, 9. 

Pupils are taught to use the principles of interpretation so as to 
understand and appreciate the New Testament writings. Several 
of these, selected from the different groups of New Testament books, 
are studied. 



7. Sunday School Pedagogy. 

Open to students from all classes. One hour a week for a 
year. Tuesday, 10. 

Miss Campbell. 

This course deals with the various phases of modern Sunday 
school work. It includes Sunday school organization and manage- 



* Not given 1921-1922. 



78 Meredith College 

ment, problems, aims, methods of teaching, pupils' characteristics, 
and a general view of the Bible as the teacher's text-book. 

Texts. — Two or more books selected from the Normal Course of 
the Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. 

8. The Principles of Sunday School Teaching. 

Open to students from all classes. One hour a week for a 
year. 

This course involves practice in lesson construction, careful study 
of the methods of Sunday School Teaching, and observation in some 
of the Sunday schools of the city. 

9. Foreign Missions. 

Elective for freshmen and sophomores. Three hours a week 
for the first semester. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 11. 

This course aims to show the reasons for missions, the influence 
of missions, methods of mission work, and the agencies through 
which Southern Baptists carry on such work. Representative mis- 
sion fields are studied, attention being given to such subjects as 
geography, racial and national characteristics, social conditions, 
religious needs, etc. Each year some country is selected for more 
detailed study, the method used for this part of the course being 
such as to prepare pupils for more effective work in mission socie- 
ties. In the fall of 1921 the study will center in China and Japan. 

10. Home Missions. 

Elective for freshmen and sophomores. Three hours a week 
for the second semester. Monday, "Wednesday, Friday, 11. 

Various forms of mission work in the home land are studied. 
Special attention is given each year to some particular phase of this 
work, or to some important problem. 

11. Pre-Eeformation Church History. 

Three hours a week for the first semester. Monday, Wednes- 
day, Friday, 10. 

This course covers the history of Christianity from the close of the 
Apostolic Age to the time of the Reformation. After a brief survey 



Courses of Instruction 79 

of the field covered by the course, attention is centered on the influ- 
ence of outstanding persons and the growth of ecclesiastical institu- 
tions. Lectures, parallel reading, and class discussion. 

12. Church History From the Beginning of the Reformation 
to the Present. 

Three hours a week for the second semester. Monday, Wednes- 
day, Friday, 10. 

The influences leading to the Reformation and its religious, politi- 
cal, moral and intellectual results are considered. Religious devel- 
opment from the Reformation to the present is traced, special atten- 
tion being given to the rise of the leading denominations and the 
influence of representative leaders. 

*13. [Theism. 

Elective for seniors. Three hours a week for the first 
semester.] 

* 14. [Comparative Religion. 

Elective for seniors. Three hours a week for the second 
semester.] 

XIII. Social Science 

Lemuel Elmer McMillan Freeman, Professor. 

1. Ethics. 

Required of juniors in the A.B. and in the B.S. courses who 
do not take Sociology. Three hours a week for the first 
semester. 

Historic types of morality are investigated. The general lines of 
moral development are noted. Representative ethical theories are 
examined. Present-day moral standards are investigated with a 
view to discovering the modification demanded by changing social 
conditions. 

Text. — Dewey and Tufts, Ethics. 



* Not given 1921-1922. 



80 Meredith College 

2. Sociology. 

Elective for juniors or seniors in the A.B. and in the B.S. 
courses. Three hours a week for the second semester. 

The development of social life is traced from its origin in primi- 
tive times to its present status in a democracy. Attention is then 
given to some of the most important social problems and the pro- 
posed methods of social reform. 

Text. — Towne, Social Problems. 



XIV. Spanish 

Beateice M. Teague, Professor. 

A. Elementary Spanish. 

Four hours a week for a year. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 
Saturday, 12. 

Thorough drill in pronunciation. Mastery of the essentials of 
grammar. Composition, reading, dictation and conversation. Pho- 
netics. 

Text. — Moreno Lacalle, Elementos de Espanol, El Panorama; 
Valera, El Pajero Verde; Moratin, El Si de Las Ninas; Espinosa, 
First Spanish Reader. 

B. Elementary Spanish. 

Four hours a week for a year. Tuesday, Thursday, Friday,. 
Saturday, 1:30. 
Grammar, prose, composition, reading and conversation. 

Texts. — Espinosa, Composition and Conservation; Valdes La Ht 
mana San Sulpicio; Galdos Dona Perfecta; Echegaray, O Locut 
o Sanidad; Calderon, La Vida es Sueflo. 



School of Music 



Faculty of School of Music 

DINGLEY BROWN, Mus.D., 

LONDON COLLEGE OF MUSIC, LICENTIATE, AND DOCTOR OF MUSIC; FELLOW SOCIETY 
OF SCIENCE AND ARTS, LONDON. 

DIRECTOR-PROFESSOR OF PIANO AND MUSIC 



MRS. WILLIAM JASPER PERRELL, 

GRADUATE OF NANSEMOND SEMINARY; PUPIL OF MRS. GREGORY MURRAY, 
PHILADELPHIA; GRADUATE OF BURROWS KINDERGARTEN SCHOOL; 
GRADUATE OF DUNNING KINDERGARTEN SCHOOL. 

PROFESSOR IN MUSIC PEDAGOGY. 



LAURA EIBERG, Mus.B., 

GOLD MEDALIST, AMERICAN CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC AND CHICAGO MUSICAL 
COLLEGE, CHICAGO. 

PROFESSOR OF PIANO. 



BLANCHE E. SNIDER, 

STUDENT OF DR. WM. CARVER WILLIAMS, OF COSMOPOLITAN SCHOOL, ELLEN 
KINSMAN MANN, CHICAGO; DAVIE BISPHAM, N. Y. 

PROFESSOR OF VOICE CULTURE. 



ALICE P. STITZEL, B.Mus., 

CHICAGO MUSICAL COLLEGE, B.MUS.; STUDENT OF ELLEN KINSMAN MANN, 
CHICAGO; A. Y. CORNELL, OF NEW YORK. 

PROFESSOR OF VOICE CULTURE. 



MARIE ADELE STILWELL, 



STUDENT OF MME. LOUISE VON FEILEITZSCH, NEW YORK CITY; CHAS. BAKER, AND 

LIZA LEHMANN. 

PROFESSOR OF VOICE CULTURE. 



MARTHA ALEXANDER MULLIN, 

GRADUATE OF COOPER INSTITUTE, NEW YORK; STUDENT IN VON ENDE SCHOOL OF 

MUSIC, NEW YORK; PUPIL OF MAX BENDIX, AND BISANSKA, NEW YORK/ TEN 

YEARS CONCERT EXPERIENCE IN UNITED STATES AND CANADA. 



PROFESSOR OF VIOLIN. 



WILHELMINA BAYER CROWELL, 

STUDENT OF COLLEGE OF MUSIC, NEW YORK CITY; GUSTAV L. BECKER, NEW YORK J 
HARMONY WITH HENRY HOLDEN HUSK AND FREDERICK SCHLEIDER. 

PROFESSOR OF PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 



84 Meredith College 

MABEL AUGUSTA BOST, 

PUPIL CINCINNATI CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC; GRADUATE OF BURROWb KINDER- 
GARTEN SCHOOL; STUDIED WITH HAROLD MORRIS, NEW YORK. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN PIANO. 



LEILA NOFFSINGER HORN, Mus.B., 

OBERLIN CONSERVATORY OP MUSIC, OBERLIN, O. ; GRADUATE IN PIANO AND THEORY; 

PUPIL IN PIANO OP MRS. MAUDE T. DOOLITTLE ; IN THEORY OP 

ARTHUR E. HEACOX; IN ORGAN OF PROF. J. F. ALDERFER. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN THEORY AND PIANO. 



VIVIEN O'BRIEN, B.Mus., 

GOLD MEDALIST, AMERICAN CONSERVATORY, CHICAGO; PIANO PUPIL OF HENIOT 
LEVY; HARMONY, COUNTERPOINT AND ENSEMBLE WITH ADOLPH WEIDIG. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN PIANO. 






Aim and Equipment 



The school aims at the production of intelligent musicians 
of liberal culture in the various departments of work. Since 
it is generally recognized that in order to have a broad and 
thorough knowledge of the science and appreciation of music 
one must also be trained along other lines, a literary require- 
ment for entrance and also for graduation is made in addition 
to the special music and theoretical work. 

The school is equipped with forty upright pianos, four 
grand pianos, one pedal piano, two organs, and a library of 
records of standard compositions for use on the pianola, making 
a thorough equipment for technical and artistic teaching. 

Admission to Music Classes 

A. Literary requirements. 

B. Musical and technical requirements. 

A. Literary requirements. 

For full admission to the freshman class a candidate must 
offer fifteen units of the entrance requirements for the A.B. 
or B.S. degree. For a detailed description of these courses, see 
pages 33-41. A unit represents four one-hour recitations or five 
forty-five-minute recitations a week throughout a secondary 
school year. 

Every candidate for a diploma in music must offer : 

English 3 units 

French 



or 
German 



2 units 



or 
Spanish 
Elective* . .' 10 units 

Total 15 units 



* Any required or elective subjects allowed for entrance to the A.B. course may 
be offered (see page 33) ; also a half- unit or a unit in the Theory of Music will 
be accepted, according to the amount of time given to the work. 



86 Meredith College 

B. Musical and technical requirements. 

Students are graded in Music according to the quality as well 
as to the quantity of work done; therefore, on entering they will 
be classified only tentatively until the value of their entrance 
Music can be determined. They will be assigned to teachers 
according to the grade of work which they are capable of doing. 
Resident students may study only with teachers engaged by the 
College. 

Piano 

First Year: 

Arm and hand and wrist foundation work; hand and finger action 
combined with the proper use of the wrist and arm. 

Scales: All major and minor scales in one octave, separate hands; 
arpeggios in major and minor triads, alternating hands, ascending 
in first position, descending in second position. 

Studies suggested: *Duvernoy, Op. 176, 2 Books; Kohler, Op. 218 
and Op. 168; Gurlitt, 197; Mrs. Virgil, Melodious Studies, 2 books. 

Pieces suggested: Dennee, Petite Valse; Gurlitt, The Fair; Neid- 
linger, Water Sprites; Pfeffercorn, Cradle Song; Ambrose, Slumber 
Song; Gurlitt, Song Without Words, Morning Song; Reinecke, Eve- 
ning Peace, Barcarolle, At Sunset, Melody; Rummel, Romance; 
Rogers, Courtly Dance; Thome, Remembrance, Cradle Song. 

Second Year: 

Scales: Further development of technical work; all major and 
minor scales, two octaves, one and two notes to M.M. 60; triads and 
dominant seventh arpeggios, alternating hands. 

Studies suggested: Kohler, Op. 242 and Op. 171; Burgmuller, Op. 
100; Gurlitt, Op. 198. 

Sonatina: *Clementi, Sonatina in C Major No. 1 or its equivalent 
required. 

Pieces suggested: Heller, U Avalanche, Curious Story; Schumann, 
Album for the Young; Gurlitt, Wanderer's Song; Lynes, Rondoletto, 
Fairy Story, Hunting Song. 

Third Year: 

Scales: Further development of technical work; all major and 
minor scales, one, two, and four notes to M.M. 60; triads; dominant 
and diminished seventh arpeggios. 



Aim and Equipment 87 

Exercises: Wolff, Der Kleine Pischna. 

Bach: First Year Bach, arranged by Foote. 

Studies: *K6hler, Op. 50; Foote, First Year Handel; Gaynor, 
Pedal Studies; Heller, Op. 47; *Brauer, Op. 15; Gurlitt, Op. 146. 

Sonatinas by Diabelli, Clementi, Kuhlau, Bertini, and others. 

Pieces suggested: Mayer, Butterflies; Tschaikowsky, Song of the 
Lark; Grieg, Patriotic Song; von Wilm, Drolleries; Scharwenka, 
Barcarolle; Handrock, Scherzino, Op. 64. 

Fourth Year: 

Scales: Technical work continued; *all scales, major and minor, 
harmonic, in four octaves, four notes to M.M. 80, parallel motion; 
all arpeggios. 

Exercises: * Wolff, Der Kleine Pischna. 

Studies suggested: *Duvernoy, Op. '120; Bertini, Op. 100; Czerny, 
Op. 636; Jensen, 25 Piano Studies; Heller, Op. 46; Gurlitt, Op. 54. 

Bach: Little Preludes. 

Sonatas or Sonatinas suggested (one required) ; Mozart, Sonata in. 
Major; Beethoven, Sonata in G Minor, Op. 49>' Clementi, Sonatina 
in D Major. 

Pieces suggested: Handel, Courante (Foote); Heller, II Penseroso; 
Jensen, Elfin Dance; Schytte, Youth and Joy; Lack, Caoaletta; 
Chaminade, Gavotte; Dennee, Tarantelle; Grieg, Album-leaf in A 
Major and in E Minor. 



Organ 



An acquaintance with the piano keyboard and a facility in sight- 
reading are necessary before beginning organ. Those who contem- 
plate taking work in this department should consult with the dean. 
Students who take their diploma in Organ must do three years of 
work in this department after having completed and been examined 
in the freshman work in Piano; therefore the entrance require- 
ments are the same as those for Piano. (See page 86.) 

Violin 

First Year: 

Correct position of violin and bow; a theoretical and practical 
knowledge of the first position; all major and minor scales in one 
octave; various rhythmical and staccato bowings. 



* No student will be admitted to the freshman music class unless she can play 
faultlessly all major and minor scales. 



88 Meredith College 

Books suggested: Hersey, Modern Violin Method; de Beriot, Violin- 
Method; Lamoureux, Violin Method. 

Etudes suggested: Wohlfahrt, Etudes; Sarnie, Etudes Mignonnes; 
St. George, 30 Short Etudes; Dancla, One Octave Exercises. 

Pieces suggested: Short pieces by Jean Conte, Bloch, Gustave 
Stube, Lange, and others. 

Second Year: 

Theoretical and practical knowledge of all the positions; all major 
and minor scales in two octaves; staccato and saltato bowings. 

Books suggested: Hrimaly, Scale Studies. 

Etudes suggested: Kayser, 36 Etudes; Meerts, Elementary Studies. 

Concertos suggested: Seitz, Pupil's Concertos, G Major, No. 2. 

Pieces by Hermann, Bohm, Dancla, Hollander, and others. 

In addition to the entrance requirements in Violin, freshmen are 
required to offer in Piano the same entrance work as those majoring 
in Piano. 

Voice 

Students wishing to take their diploma in Voice must offer the 
same entrance work in Piano as those majoring in Piano. The 
Voice work of students who cannot meet the entrance requirements 
will be rated as preparatory. 



Theory 

A knowledge of notation ; the formation of major and minor scales, 
and of major and minor triads; relative keys, simple time, tonality; 
and intonation. 

Conditioned Students 

A freshman may be conditioned to the extent of two units, 
but only a slight condition will be allowed in the department in 
which she majors. 

Sophomores may have conditions not exceeding three hours, 
s but only a slight condition in practical music will be allowed. 



School of Music 89 

Juniors and seniors may be conditioned to the extent of 
three hours in their theoretical and literary work, but no stu- 
dent will be rated as a junior or senior if conditioned in the 
department in which she majors. 

Irregular Students 

Music students may be admitted as irregular under the con- 
ditions laid down in either A or B. If in residence, they are 
required to take fifteen hours a week. 

A. Those who cannot meet the entrance requirements in 
practical Music, but who offer fifteen entrance units, includ- 
ing three in English and two in French or German, may be 
classed as irregular students in Music. They may be conditioned 
to the extent of two units. 

B. Those who are at least twenty years of age and give proof 
of adequate preparation for the courses sought may be classed 
as irregular students in Music. 

Requirements for Graduation 

To be entitled to a diploma from the School of Music, the 
student, in addition to the fifteen units offered for entrance, 
must have satisfactorily completed the course in Piano, Organ, 
Yiolin, or. Yoice, the required theoretical and literary courses, 
the required number of electives (see courses outlined, pages 
93-95, for Diploma in Music), and must have given a public 
recital of standard works from memory in a creditable and 
artistic manner. Graduates in Organ, Yiolin, and Yoice must 
have completed and been examined on the sophomore work in 
Piano. 

Each music student is required to take approximately forty- 
five hours of work a week. This is the equivalent of the num- 
ber of hours assigned the students in the A.B. and B.S. courses, 
where it is rated as fifteen hours of recitation and thirty hours 



90 Meredith College 

of preparation. No student may take more than forty-eight 
hours of work a week, except by action of the academic council. 
A senior is not required to take more than the number of hours 
necessary to obtain her diploma. 

During the regular examination week at the end of the sec- 
ond semester all students studying in the School of Music, 
except mature nonresident students registered for music only, 
will take an examination before the College Music teachers. 
Those taking Preparatory Music will have an examination 
before the instructors in that department, and the director. 

At the end of the first semester, examinations will be given to 
such students as apply for them, and to those who, in the opin- 
ion of the teacher and director, should take them. 

Public School Music 

In order to meet the demand for well-equipped public school 
music supervisors, Meredith College offers a four-year course 
leading to a diploma in this subject, the first two years of which 
are the same as for the regular music course. See pages 94-95. 

The aim of this course is to train the student in subject- 
matter, to bring her to an appreciation of the general con- 
ditions to be found in the schoolroom, and to prepare her to 
meet, in an efficient manner, the supervisor's problems from the 
primary grades through the high school. 

Students' Recitals 

Students' recitals are held every Thursday at five o'clock. 
All music students are required to attend, and to take part in 
them when requested to do so by their teachers. 

Freshmen and sophomores in all departments will appear in 
recital at least once each semester. However, freshmen in 
Voice may be excused the first semester at the discretion of the 
instructor. Juniors will be heard twice each semester ; seniors, 
at the discretion of their major professors. Preparatory stu- 



School of Music 91 

dents and college students not majoring in Music will be required 
to appear once a year. Each number on the programs will 
include a study or an exercise. 

Only graduates and unconditioned seniors may give indi- 
vidual recitals. Those completing merely the work in Piano, 
Voice, Organ, or Violin, but who have not taken the theoretical 
and literary work outlined in the course of study leading to a 
Diploma in Music, may appear in college programs only in 
groups of three as advanced students. 

All students' recitals are under the supervision of the director, 
who will arrange the programs with the teachers whose students 
are to take part in them. 

Concerts 

The students have frequent opportunities of hearing noted 
artists in concert, which is of incalculable benefit to those pur- 
suing a musical education. Music students are expected to 
attend all concerts given under the auspices of the College. 

Recitals, which are free to all students, are given at intervals 
during the session by members of the Music faculty. 

Music Supplies 

Music students are expected to deposit a sum of money at 
the beginning of the session, sufficient to pay for music supplies 
used. College students should deposit $5 ; preparatory students, 
$2.50. Music supplies will be under the direction of the College, 
and may be got from the secretary at her office hours. No music 
will be charged to students. 



92 Meredith College 



Credit 


Total 




Hours 


Hours 


Page 


3 


9 


(61) 


3 


9 


(67) 


3 


9 


(64,66) 


1 


4 


(97) 




1 


(90) 




1 






15 





Outline of Course for Diploma in School of Music 

Freshman Year 

Subjects 

^English Composition 1 

♦European History 1 

^French 1 or German 1 

♦Theory 1 

Recitals 

Two half-hour music lessons each week 

t$Practice 

Total hours for work each week, — 

including preparation 48 



Sophomore Year 

♦English Literature 1 

♦French 2 or German 2 

♦Harmony 1 

♦Music History 1 

Recitals 

Two half-hour music lessons each week 

-j-JPractice 

Total hours of work each week, — 

including preparation 47 



3 


9 


(62) 


3 


9 


(64,66) 


2 


6 


(97) 


2 


6 


(99) 




1 


(90) 




1 






15 





* Each hour of recitation is supposed to require two hours of preparation. 

t Students majoring in Organ practice one to two hours daily; the rest of their 
practice hours are in Piano. 

t Freshmen and sophomores in Voice practice only one or two hours daily in 
this subject; the remainder of their practice hours are in Piano, the freshman 
"work of which is to be completed by the end of the sophomore year. 



School of Music 



93 






Junior Tear 

Subjects 

Analysis 

Harmony 2 

Music History 2 

Music Pedagogy 1 

♦Electives 

Ensemble 

Recitals 

Two half-hour music lessons each week 

t$Fractice 

Total hours for work each week, 
including preparation 



Credit 
Hours 

1 

2 
2 
1 
3 



Total 
Hours Page 

3 (98) 



6 
6 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 
20 

48 



(98) 
(99) 
(99) 
(100) 
(90) 



Senior Year 

Harmony 3 

Music Pedagogy 2 

♦Electives 

Chamber Music 

Interpretation 

Recitals 

Two half-hour music lessons each week 

§Practice 

Total hours for work each week, 
including preparation 



2 


6 


(98) 


1 


3 


(100) 


3 


9 


(101) 




1 


(101) 




1 


(90) 




1 






1 






20 





42 



* Electives may be chosen from any required or elective subject in any depart- 
ment. Those expecting to teach are advised to elect Education. 

t Students majoring in Organ practice two hours daily; the rest of their prac- 
tice hours are in Piano. 

t Juniors and seniors majoring in Voice practice two hours daily. The other 
hours are made up in sophomore Piano. 

§ Students majoring in Voice or Violin who have finished sophomore Piano 
may elect Piano, credit one hour a year. 



94 Meredith College 



Total 




Hours 


Pajre 


9 


(67) 


4 


(97) 


6 


(61) 


9 


(64,66) 


1 


(65,66) 


1 


(90) 


15 to 16 





Outline of Course for Diploma in Public School Music 

Freshman Tear 

Credit 
Subjects Hours 

""European History 1 3 

*Theory 1 1 

*English Composition 1 2 

*French 1 or German 1 3 

Recitals 

Two half-hour piano lessons each week 

^Practice 

Total hours of work each week, 

including preparation 45 to 46 



Sophomore Tear 

*Harmony 1 2 

*Music History 1 2 

*English Literature 1 3 

*French 2 or German 2 3 

Ensemble 

Recitals 

Two half-hour piano lessons each week 

^Practice 

Total hours of work each week, 

including preparation 45% to 48 



6 


(97) 


6 


(99) 


9 


(62) 


9 


(64,66) 


1 


(100) 


1 


(90) 


1 




12y 2 to 15 





* Each hour of recitation is supposed to require two hours of preparation. 
f Music students taking work in the college choir may count the time as one of 
the maximum number of weekly practice hours. 



School of Music 95 



Junior Tear 

Credit Total 

Subjects Hours Hours Page 

Analysis 1 3 (98) 

Harmony 2 2 6 (98) 

*Music History 2 2 6 (99) 

♦Methods 1 2 6 (100) 

Music Pedagogy 1 1 (99) 

♦Psychology, 1st semester 1% ( (57) 

♦Education 2, 2d semester 1% \ (56) 

Electives 9 (90) 

Recitals 1 

Two half-hour voice lessons each week 1 

^Practice 5 to 6 

Total hours of work each week, 

including preparation 47 to 48 

Senior Tear 

Education 3 

Harmony 3 2 

Methods 2 2 

Music Pedagogy 2 1 

♦fElectives 3 

College Choir 

Recitals 

Two half-hour voice lessons each week 

^Practice 

Total hours of work each week, — 

including preparation 45 



9 


(56) 


6 


(98) 


6 


(100) 


3 


(100) 


9 


(101) 


1 


(90) 


1 




1 




9 





* Each hour of recitation is supposed to require two hours of preparation. 

t These elective hours may be chosen from the A.B. or B.S. course, subject to the 
approval of the dean or another year's work in Piano may be taken. 

t Music students taking work in the college choir may count the time as one of 
the six practice hours. 



96 



Meredith College 



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School of Music 97 



"^Theoretical Department 

Dingley Brown, Professor. 

Mrs. William Jasper Ferrell, Professor. 

Laura Eiberg, Professor. 

Lelia Noffsinger Horn, Associate Professor. 

Theory 

1. Theory and Sightsinging (Solfeggio). 

Required of freshmen. Two hours of class work and two 
hours of preparation a week. Tuesday, Friday, 9 and 1:30. 

First semester: Notation; study of diatonic intervals; major and 
harmonic minor scales; simple times; accent and rhythm; clefs; 
triads, both major and minor. 

Interval and melody writing by dictation; recognition of major 
and minor triads by ear. 

Second semester: Chromatic intervals; chromatic and melodic 
minor scales; compound time; diminished and augmented triads; 
music terminology; transposition; more advanced rhythm. 

More advanced melody writing by dictation; continuation of 
chromatic intervals and triads. 

Sight-singing exercises in different rhythms and melody sight- 
singing; practice in beating time and all other essentials that 
precede the study of harmony. 



Harmony 

1. Harmony. 



Required of sophomores. Elective for A.B. and B.S. students. 
Two hours a week for a year. Tuesday, Friday, 11. 

First semester: Intervals, triads and their inversions; progres- 
sions of parts; dominant seventh chord; perfect and plagal cadences, 
both written and played; harmonization of simple melodies in four 
parts open score. 

Second semester: Simple counterpoint, all five species, in two and 
three parts, open score, using all clefs. 



Maximum credit allowed toward the A.B. or B. S. degree is six hours. 

7 



98 Meredith College 

2. Harmony. 

Required of juniors. Elective for A.B. and B.S. students. 
Two hours a week for a year. Wednesday, Saturday, 12. 

First semester: Simple counterpoint in four and five parts, all 
five species; also combination of species and points of imitation. 

Second semester: Fundamental and secondary discords; domi- 
nant seventh; major and minor ninth; major and minor eleventh; 
writing simple original melodies. 

3. Harmony. 

Required of seniors. Two hours a week for a year. Tuesday, 
Friday, 11. 

First semester: Major and minor thirteenth; chromatic and mixed 
discords. All cadences, sequences, suspensions, pedal points; modu- 
lations, both written and at the keyboard. 

Second semester: Writing original melodies, and harmonizing 
same; canon and fugue. 



Analysis 



1. Musical Form and Analysis. 

Required of juniors. Elective for A.B. and B.S. students. One 
hour a week for a year. Thursday, 9. 

Elements of musical form from the motive and primary to the 
analysis of important types of classic and modern music with special 
reference to the sonata as the type of the perfect form. 



Composition 

1. Composition. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. One hour a week for a year. 

Original piano composition in the forms of the classic period; 
Minuet, Gavotte, Bourree, Rondo, Sonatina, Sonata; writing of 
songs, anthems, and other vocal compositions. 






School of Music 99 



2. Instrumentation. 



Open to students who have completed Composition 1. One 
hour a week for a year. 

A thorough and practical study of all the instruments of the 
modern orchestra; the reading of orchestral scores; transposition 
at sight of any phrase into the key and setting (clef) needed for any 
given instrument; arranging of piano compositions for (a) string 
orchestra, (&) full orchestra, (c) for choral use; the arranging of 
orchestral scores for piano for two hands, four hands, and eight 
hands. 



History of Music 



1. History of Music. 

Required of sophomores. Elective for A.B. and B.S. students. 
Two hours a week for a year. Wednesday, Saturday, 11. 

A detailed and intensive study of the history of Music from primi- 
tive times to the present time with the background of political and 
social history. 

This course may not be taken until English Composition 1 and 
History 6 have been completed. 

Text. — Matthews, History of Music. 

2. Advanced History of Music. 

Open to Music seniors. Two hours a week for a year. Mon- 
day, and Thursday, 2:30. 

A critical analysis of instrumental and vocal masterpieces of all 
periods, with special attention to orchestral and choral works. 



Music Pedagogy 
1. Music Pedagogy. 

Required of juniors. One lecture each week. This work does 
not require preparation. Wednesday, 11. 

Methods of teaching to children notation, piano technique, ele- 
ments of theory, rhythm, ear training. Material for beginners of 
different ages. 



100 Meredith College 

2. Music Pedagogy. 

Required of seniors. One hour a week for a year. Thurs- 
day, 9. 

Continuation of the work of the junior year, with special refer- 
ence to class work; methods of presenting major and minor scales 
and triads, dominant seventh and diminished chords; lectures on 
general aspects of piano teaching; a systematic study of teaching 
material; means and methods of correcting mistakes in technique, 
intonation and rhythm. 

Students taking this work do two hours of practice teaching each 
week under the direct supervision of the instructor. 



Public School Music Methods 

1. Public School Methods. 

Required of juniors and seniors in Public School Music. 
Elective for other students, and as such counts one hour 
toward a degree. Two hours a week for two years. 

Problems and methods of music instruction in the grades and in 
the high school; beating time; sight-reading; individual and part 
singing; rote songs; how to conduct the music period; formation 
and conducting of school choruses and orchestras; the necessity for 
music study in public schools; supervision; relation of supervisor to 
other teachers, the superintendent, and to the community. 

Ensemble Playing 
1. Ensemble. 

Required of juniors. One hour a week for a year. Tuesday, 
5 p. m. 

Four- and eight-hand arrangements of the simpler overtures ant 
symphonies of the classical masters, with the addition of stringed 
instruments, are studied. Ensemble is valuable in that it cultivates 
self-control, proficiency in sight-reading, steadiness of rhythm, am 
quick adjustment to the artistic needs of the moment. 



School of Music 101 



2. Chamber Music. 



One hour a week. Required of seniors. Wednesday, 7 : 45-9 : 45 
p. m. 

One of the chief advantages which a School of Music offers is the 
opportunity for advanced ensemble playing. The course comprises 
a practical study of the classic and modern works of Chamber Music 
from the easy sonatas by Haydn and Mozart to the more advanced 
forms of Chamber Music, such as trios and quartets by Beethoven, 
Mendelssohn, Schubert, Brahms, and others. 

Classes are organized as follows: (1) Chamber Music for piano 
and stringed instruments, 1 hour per week; (2) String quartet class, 
1 hour per week. 

Interpretation Class 

1. Interpretation. 

Required of seniors. One hour a week for the year. Wednes- 
day, 2:30. 

The aim of this class is to enable students to understand and in- 
terpret the work of all periods and styles through a knowledge of 
the aesthetic principles involved in their development. In order to 
understand the real thoughts and emotions of musical compositions 
it is necessary to make a detailed study not only of the life and 
character of the composer, but also of the forms of expression pecu- 
liar to him and to his time. Special attention is given to the study 
of musical ornamentation, appoggiatura, acciaccatura, turns, mor- 
dents and trills. Compositions studied by different members of the 
class are analyzed, and thus all the class gain a wider knowledge of 
musical literature than each alone is able to acquire. 

Chorus and Choir Training 

1. Chorus and Choir Training. 

Required of Music students with good singing voices, and open 
to other students with good singing voices. One hour a week 
for a year. Thursday, 3:30. 

The college choir is composed of approximately sixty voices. The 
best music, consisting of hymns, anthems, and choruses, is studied. 
The choir leads the music in chapel exercises, besides being heard 
occasionally in musical services Sunday afternoons, and on other 
public occasions. 



102 Meredith College 



Department of Pianoforte 

Dingley Brown, Professor. 

Laura Eiberg, Professor. 

Mabel Augusta Bost, Associate Professor. 

Lelia Noffsinger Horn, Associate Professor. 

Vivien O'Brien, Associate Professor. 

1. Freshman. 

Scales: Major and both forms of minor, similar and contrary mo- 
tion; also two, three and four to one. 

Arpeggios: Major and minor triads; dominant and diminished 
sevenths; similar motion. 

Technique: Provided and applied according to the needs of the 
individual student. 

Etudes: Czerny, Op. 299; Biehl, 12 Melodious Studies; Heller, 
Op. 46; Loeschhorn, Op. 66. 

Bach: Two-part Inventions (8 required). 

Sonatas: Haydn, D Major; E Minor and F; Mozart, F Major; 
Clementi, D Major. Any other Sonatas of the same grade accepted. 

Pieces: The easier Songs without Words by Mendelssohn; Grieg's 
Album heaves, and pieces of similar difficulty. 

2. Sophomore. 

Scales: Major and both forms of minor, in thirds, sixths and 
tenths; similar and contrary motion; also two, three and four to 
one; and all 

Arpeggios: In sixths; eighths and tenths, in similar and contrary 
motion. 

Technique: Enlarged so as to meet all requirements of the grade. 

Etudes: Czerny, Op. 299, continued; Cramer, selected studies; 
Heller, Op. 45; Loeschhorn, Op. 67, BJc. 1; Low Octave Studies , 
Bach, Three-part Inventions (10 required). 

Sonatas: Mozart, In D; Beethoven, Op. 14, Nos. 1 and 2; Op. 2, 
No. 1; and others of like difficulty. 

Pieces: Rheinberger, Ballade in G Minor; Raff, La Fileuse; Grieg, 
Op. 43; Rubinstein, Romance; Seeboeck, Gondoliera; MacDowell, 
Woodland Sketches. 



School of Music 103 

3. Junior. 

Scales: In double thirds, both, major and minor. 

Technique: Continued double notes. Moszkowski. 

Etudes: Clementi, Gradas ad Parnassum; Haberbier, Op. 53; Jen- 
sen, Op. 32; Loeschhorn, Op. 67, Bks. 2 and 3; Heller, Op. 16; Kullak, 
Op. 48, Bk. 2. 

Bach: Well tempered Clavichord. 

Sonatas: Beethoven, Op. 10, Nos. 1, 2, 3; Op. 26; Op. 27; or others 
of same grade. 

Pieces: Chopin, Waltzes; Polonaises; Schubert, Impromptus; 
Schumann, Bird Prophet, and modern works of the same grade of 
difficulty. 

4. Senior. 

Scales: Continued in double thirds at increased tempo; also 
double sixths, both major and minor. Technical work continued. 

Etudes: Selected from Moscheles, Op. 70; Bennett, Op. 11; Chopin; 
Thalberg; Rubinstein. 

Bach: Well tempered Clavichord. 

Sonatas: Beethoven; Brahms; Grieg; Schumann. 

Pieces: Liszt, Leibestraum ; Chopin, Ballades G Minor and A Flat; 
Impromptu A Flat; Scherzo B Flat Minor; Rubinstein, Fourth and 
fifth Barcarolle, and others of the same grade, both ancient and 
modern. 

5. Graduate Course. 

For those desiring to prepare themselves more fully for teaching 
or for piano playing, a course will be arranged. Wide discretion 
will be exercised in selecting works to be studied. 

/ 

Department of Organ 

Dingley Brown, Professor. 
1. f Freshman. 

Scales: Major and both forms of minor, similar and contrary 
motion; also two, three and four to one. 

Arpeggios: Major and minor triads; dominant and diminished 
sevenths; similar motion. 



t As students who take their diploma in Organ must do three years in the de- 
partment after having completed the freshman work in Piano, the freshman year 
will be devoted to Piano, and the regular work in Organ will begin with the 
sophomore year. 



104 Meredith College 

Technique: Provided and applied according to the needs of the 
individual student. 

Etudes: Czerny, Op. 299; Biehl, 12 Melodious Studies; Heller, 
Op. 40; Loeschhorn, Op. 66, 

Bach: Two-part Inventions (8 required). 

Sonatas: Haydn, D Major; E Minor, and F; Mozart, F Major; 
Clementi, D Major. Any other Sonatas of the same grade accepted. 

Pieces: The easier Songs without Words by Mendelssohn; Grieg's 
Album Leaves, and pieces of similar difficulty. 

2. *Sophomore. 

Pedal technique established; organ touch; Clemmens, Organ 
School, Book 1; Stainer, Organ School; Horner, Pedal Studies; 
Whiting, Pedal Studies for Beginners. 

Bach: Easy Preludes and Fugues; Choral Preludes; Hymn Playing. 

Easier pieces by Guilmant, Batiste, Lemare, Rogers, and others. 

3. Junior. 

Studies: Nilson, Pedal Studies; Dudley Buck, Pedal Phrasing 
Studies; Bach, Little Preludes and Fugues. 

Selections from Handel, Rheinberger, Guilmant, Dubois, and 
other standard composers. 

Transposing hymn tunes at sight; modulation for church use; 
accompanying solos and choruses; registration. 

4. Senior. 

Bach: Greater Preludes and Fugues. Sonatas and other composi- 
tions of Handel, Mendelssohn, Rheinberger, Guilmant, Widor, 
Rogers, Dubois, Saint-Saens. 

Adaptation of piano and orchestral scores for organ; transposi- 
tion; sight reading; accompanying. 

Department of Violin 

Martha Alexander Mtjixin, Professor. 
1. Freshman. 

Scales: Major and minor scales in three octaves; all legato and 
staccato bowings. Method for Violin, Nicholas Laoureaux. 



* As graduates in Organ must have completed and been examined on sophomore 
Piano, students will continue their piano work after the freshman year, with at 
least one lesson a week. 



School of Music 105 

Exercises: Dancla, Daily Exercises; Wolfhardt, Melodious 
Studies, 3d position; Sevcik, Violin Technic, Books I and II; exer- 
cises and double stops. 

Etudes: Kayser, Etudes, Books II and III; Mazas, Etudes Speciales. 

Pieces suggested: Ortmans, Concerto, D Major; Sitt, Student Con- 
certos; Schubert, Sonatinas; Kriens, Suite; Accolay, Concertos, or 
studies and pieces of similar difficulty. 

2. Sophomoke. 

Scales: Scales and Arpeggios in three octaves; Halir, Preparatory 
Scale Studies. 

Exercises: Sevcik, Books II and III; exercises in thirds. 

Etudes: Dont, 24 Etudes; Leonard, La Petite Gymnastique; Wil- 
helmy, Etudes. 

Pieces suggested: Accolay, Concerto; Vivaldi, Concerto; Correlli, 
Sonatas, Nos. 8 and 10; de Beriot, Scene de Ballet; David, Romance; 
Vieuxtemps, Trois Morceaux de Salon; Spohr, Barcarolle. 

3. Junior. 

Scales: Halir, scales in octaves and thirds; Casorti, Bowing Tech- 
nique. 

Exercises: Sevcik, Book IV; Leonard, La Grande Gymnastique; 
Flesch, TJrstudien. 

Etudes: Kreutzer, 42 Etudes; Fiorillo, 36 Etudes; Rode, 12 Etudes. 

Sonatas: Nardini, D Major; Handel, A Major, No. 6; Tartini, G 
Minor. 

Pieces suggested: de Beriot, Concertos, Nos. 9, 8, and 7; Rode, 
Concertos. A Minor No. 7 and E Minor No. 8; Vieuxtemps, Ballade 
and Polonaise, Romance in F ; Beethoven, Romanze in F; and other 
pieces by standard composers. 

Chamber Music: Sonatas for Violin and Piano — Mozart, E Minor 
No. 4, A Major No. 1, D Major No. 3, F Major No. 1 ; Beethoven, 
D Major No. 1; quartets by Haydn and Mozart. 

A violin class meets two hours each week, and juniors are required 
to attend at least one hour. Part of the time is given to technical 
work done by the whole class in concert, and a part to solo work, 
which is discussed and criticized by the members of the class. 

4. Senior. 

Scales: Scales and technical work continued; Halir and Casorti. 
Etudes: Kreutzer, 42 Etudes; Fiorillo, 36 Etudes; Rode, 24 Etudes; 
Gavinies, Caprices; Campagnoli, Caprices. 



106 Meredith College 

Sonatas: Bach, G Minor, E Major; Leclair, Le Tombeau; Ciaccona, 
Vivaldi. 

Concertos by Vieuxtemps, Bruch, Mendelssohn, Spohr and Wien- 
iawkei; other standard compositions. 

Chamber Music: Sonatas for Violin and Piano — Beethoven, Nos. 5 
and 7; Mozart, Nos. 10, 11, and 12; Schumann, A Minor; Brahms, 
D Minor; trios and quartets by Beethoven Mendelssohn, Hummel, 
Rubinstein. 

A violin class meets two hours each week, and seniors are required 
to attend at least one hour. Part of the time is given to technical 
work done by the whole class in concert, and a part to solo work, 
which is discussed and criticized by the members of the class. 

5. Graduate Course. 

For those desiring to perfect themselves more fully for concert 
work or for advanced teaching, a special course will be given. It 
will include a study of the concertos and greater works of Beethoven, 
Mendelssohn, Paganini, Bruch, Sinding, Goldmark, Brahms, Techai- 
kowsky, Ernst, Lalo, and others. 

Department of Voice 

Blanche Snider, Professor. 
Alice Florence Stitzel, Professor. 
Marie Adele Stilwell, Professor. 

1. Freshman. 

Vocal anatomy; tone placing and formation; development of the 
chest; breath control; breathing allied with attack; staccato. 

Studies: Behnke and Pearce, Vaccai, Abt, Nave. 

Songs suggested: Cowan, Snowflakes ; Gaynor, Group of Five 
Songs; Shelley, The Arabian Slave; H. Norris, Thou art so like a 
Flower. 

2. Sophomore. 

The technical work of the freshman year continued; exercises for 
equalization of registers. 

Studies: Vaccai, Abt, Nave, Vigna, Bordogni, Panofka, Concone. 

English and American songs suggested: Huntington Woodman, 
An Open Secret; Whitney Coombs, An Indian Serenade; Cadman, 
The Shrine; A. Whiting, Three Songs, Op. 21; M. Beach, A Prelude. 



School of Music 107 

3. Junior. 

Technical work continued; dynamics; the portamento; mordents; 
trills; cadenzas. 

Studies: Concone, Marchesi, Panseron. 

Arias from the following oratorios: Handel, The Messiah; Men- 
delssohn, Elijah; from the following operas: Gluck, Orpheus and 
Eurydice; Gounod, Faust; Bizet, Carmen; Massenet, Manon. 

Songs selected from the following: American and English, com- 
posers, MacDowell, La Forge, Salter, Spross, S. Homer, A. Ware, Van 
der Stucken, Chadwick, Parsons, Damrosch, Huhn; German com- 
posers, Schubert, Schumann, Franz, Lassen, Abt, Mendelssohn; 
Italian composers, Marchesi, Lamperti, Dell 'Sede, Bordogni, Bor- 
dese; French composers. R. Hahn, Massenet, Faure, Godard, Thome, 
Lemaire, Viardot. 

4. Senior. 

Technical work continued. 

Selections from the following: Arias from the following oratorios: 
The Messiah, Samson, The Creation, Elijah, Gallia, Staoat Mater 
(Rossini), and from classic and modern operas. Songs from modern 
and classic composers continued. 

Needs of the College 

The standard of college education is advancing so rapidly 
in the South that it will be necessary for the endowment to 
be constantly increased, if Meredith is to carry out the ideals 
of its founders. Each year the need of additional library and 
laboratory equipment makes itself more strongly felt, and higher 
salaries are demanded by experienced college-trained teachers. 
As $300,000 is generally recognized as the minimum endowment 
for a standard college, gifts to increase the endowment fund 
are especially needed. 

As Meredith has been rated by educational authorities as 
coming nearer to the standard set by the Association of Col- 
leges and Secondary Schools of the Southern States than any 
other college for women in JSTorth Carolina, we hope that those 



108 Meredith College 

interested in the education of women will enable us to increase 
our equipment so that we may fulfill all the conditions now de- 
manded by standard colleges. 

In order to do this, it will be necessary for us to have gifts 
and bequests providing for : 

1. New Dormitories. 

2. Science Building. 

3. Increase of General Endowment. 

4. Endowment of Professorships. 

5. Loan Fund. 

6. Scholarships.* 

7. Gymnasium. 

8. Infirmary Building. 

9. Library Building. 

10. Music Building. 

11. Laundry Building. 

12. Larger Grounds. 

Since many in the State are unable to make large donations, 
we must depend for the present mainly on legacies and numer- 
ous small gifts; hence we suggest the following forms to any 
desiring to make a bequest to the College in their wills : 

I give and bequeath to Meredith College the sum of 

dollars, for the use and benefit of the said College. 

I give and bequeath to Meredith College the sum of 

thousand dollars, to be invested and called the 

Scholarship (or Professorship). 

I give and bequeath to Meredith College the sum of 

thousand dollars, to be used for a building. 

* Income from two thousand dollars will endow a tuition scholarship ; income 
from seven thousand dollars at six per cent will endow a scholarship covering all 
expenses in the literary course. 






Register of College Students 

A.B. and B.S. Courses 



SENIOR CLASS 

Ayers, Addie Cornelia, B.S Rowland 

Baity, Annie Hall, A.B Winston-Salem 

Beal, Sallie Mae, A.B Rocky Mount 

Beasley, Mildred Anderson, A.B Kenansville 

Biggs, Ellen Jeannette, B.S Lumberton 

Boyd, Inez Hodnett, A.B Roxboro 

Bridger, Evelyn Barrett, A.B Lewiston 

Cullom, Elizabeth, A.B Wake Forest 

Drake, Elizabeth Moultrie, A.B Bennettsville, S. C. 

Fleming, Louise Elizabeth, A.B Greenville 

Jenkins, Edith, A.B Henrietta 

Johnson, Mary Martin, A.B Raleigh 

Judd, Cornelia Christine, A.B Sanford 

Judd, Hilda Lane, A.B Raleigh 

Judd, Mary Lynne, A.B Sanford 

Lamm, Alberta Waldine, A.B Lucama 

Lawrence, Alva, A.B Apex 

Mauney, Jamie Athlene, B.S New London 

Parker, Coralie, A.B Keif ord 

Penton, Lidie Winstead, A.B Wilmington 

Pierce, Ella Janet, A.B Colerain 

Reynolds, Lulie Snow Virginia, B.S Raleigh 

Smith, Sybil Hollingsworth, B.S Rich Square 

Smitherman, Gertrude Martin, A.B East Bend 

Sullivan, Mary Edith, A.B Marble Hill, Mo. 

Taylor, Sarah Elizabeth, A.B Rutherfordton 

Uzzle, Annie Grey, B.S .Atlantic City, N. J. 

White, Mary Fisher, B.S Windsor 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Arnette, Annie Juanita, A.B Wagram 

Bennett, Mary Sheldon, B.S Roseboro 

Brewer, Ann Eliza, A.B Raleigh 

Brown, Annie Katherine, A.B Lewiston 



110 Meredith College 

Clay, Alma Thomas, B.S Whitakers 

Couch, Ruth Richardson, B.S Fayetteville 

Dowell, Lilla Earle, B.S Birmingham, Ala. 

Felton, Alethea, A.B Beaufort 

Gibson, Ruth, A.B Gibson 

Gordon, Lizzie Moore, B.S Barkersville, Va. 

Hart, Virginia Elizabeth, A.B Meherrin, Va. 

Hollowell, Minnie Beulah Virginia, A.B Edenton 

Inscoe, Josie Lucile, B.S Castalia 

Matthews, Ellison Kathleen, A.B Clinton 

Moore, Bertha Wilson, A.B Hamlet 

Nooe, Sarah, B.S Statesville 

Olive, Lowney Virginia, A.B Dunn 

Parrish, Myrtle Lee, B.S Castalia 

Sentelle, Mary Evelyn, B.S. . . Tarboro 

Sheets, Ruth Litchford, B.S Raleigh 

Watson, Annadawn, A.B Jackson, Ga. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Adams, Eula Blue, B.S Hamlet 

Allen, Jessie Estelle, A.B St. Pauls 

Bowden, Margaret Louise, A.B Charlotte 

Bowen, Annie Goulder, A.B Raleigh 

Cobb, Lela Edna, A.B Gastonia 

Deaton, DeLila Celeste, A.B Troy 

Duncan, Margaret Meadows, A.B Nathalie, Va. 

Durham, Wilma Causler, B.S Lumberton 

Farrior, Mary Frances, B.S Raleigh 

Foreman, Banks, A.B Waynesville 

Harris, Annie Wood, A.B Elizabeth City 

Hocutt, Olivia, A.B Ashton 

Horton, Lillian Myatt, B.S Raleigh 

Huff, Grace, A.B Mars Hill 

Huggins, Hettie, A.B Hendersonville 

Kendrick, Elizabeth, A.B Raeford 

Kendrick, Lois Ida, A.B .Cherryville 

Leonard, Gladys, A.B Ramseur 

Lineberry, Annie Ruth, A.B Raleigh 

Livermon, Lydia Ruth, A.B Norfolk, Va. 

Lowe, Alice Louise, A.B Chadbourn 

Mays, Louise, A.B Portsmouth, Va. 

Mays, Phyllis, A.B Portsmouth, Va. 



Register of Students 111 

Moore, Erma Marsh, B.S Winston-Salem 

Parker, Josephine, A.B Raleigh 

Pierce, Carrie Elizabeth, A.B Colerain 

Ruffin, Miriam Virginia, B.S * Raleigh 

Smith, Lois Turlene, A.B Seaboard 

Sykes, Claudilene, B.S Castalia 

Tillery, Doris Katherine, A.B Scotland Neck 

Underwood, Iola Thomasine, A.B Canton 

West, Wilma May, A.B Warsaw 

White, Bernice Jeannette, B.S Winston-Salem 

Wyatt, Margaret Elizabeth, A.B Winterville 

Yelvington, Lorna Ruth, A.B Clayton 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Allen, Marion, B.S Lumberton 

Anderson, Loduska, A.B Mars Hill 

Andrews, Elva Dare, A.B Chapel Hill 

Ayers, Nina Evelyn, A.B Rowland 

Beaman, Joyner, A.B Stantonsburg 

Beaty, Addie Elizabeth, A.B Wilson Mills 

Benthall, Nell Cropsy, A.B Woodland 

Bostic, Lessie, A.B Beulaville 

Bowen, Gertrude, B.S Durham 

Boyce, Gladys, A.B Thomasville 

Brickhouse, Helen, A.B Creswell 

Britton, Jamie, A.B Vineland 

Britton, Ruth Shaw, A.B Colerain 

Brown, Florence Elizabeth, A.B Macclesfield 

Brown, Gladys Blanche, A.B Blowing Rock 

Buffalo, Ruth, B.S Garner 

Bunn, Lena Elizabeth, A.B Zebulon 

Burleson, Hattie, A.B Albemarle 

Cashwell, Jessie, A.B Parkersburg 

Chambers, Celeste, B.S Raleigh 

Cherry, Frances Mark, A.B Mount Olive 

Coats, Mary Gladys, A.B Clayton 

Covington, Andrea, B.S Wadesboro 

Crosby, Ina, B.S Sulphur Springs, Tex. 

Crosby, Nell, B.S Sulphur Springs, Tex. 

Crozier, Dolores, A.B Raleigh 

Current, Ruth Augusta, B.S Cleveland 

Davenport, Bessie, A.B Pineville 



112 Meredith College 

Day, Phoebe, A.B Booneville 

Deans, Nell Laurie, A.B Colerain 

Dixon, Vera, A.B Shelby 

Earp, Elizabeth, A.B Selma 

Eason, Clara, B.S Selma 

Eason, Lily Mae, B.S Selma 

Elliott, Helen Gray, B.S Nelson, Va. 

Fleming, Margaret, A.B Greenville 

Flora, Minnie, A.B Shawboro 

Freeman, Ruth, A.B Hamlet 

Fussell, Bettie Idell, B.S Teachey 

Gibbs, Gladys, A.B Mill Springs 

Gillette, Ethel, B.S Maysville 

Goodwin, Bernice, A.B Apex 

Gower, Dorothy Robertson, A.B. Clayton 

Greer, Cairo Eva, B.S Chase City, Va. 

Griffin, Mary Grant, A.B Woodland 

Grubb, Laura Edna, B.S Laurinburg^ 

Harris, Leona, B.S Portsmouth, Va. 

Haywood, Frances, A.B Mount Gilead 

Henderson, Sarah, B.S Hendersonville 

Herring, Susie, A.B China 

Horn, Marie Pattie, A.B East Bend 

Horton, Alia Meta, A.B Bunn 

Horton, Bonnie Belle, A.B Buies Creek 

Horton, Savon lone, B.S Raleigh 

Howard, Frances Hunter, B.S Hickory 

Hoyle, Eunice Christobel, B.S Gastonia 

Huff, Jessie, A.B Mars Hill 

Hunter, Margaret, A.B Raleigh 

Jessup, Clara Mae, A.B South Hill, Va. 

Jeffries, Doris Turner, AB Clayton 

Johnson, Annie Lou, A.B St. Pauls. 

Johnson, Stella Beatrice, A.B Apex 

Johnston, Mary Louise, A.B Briston, Tenn. 

Josey, Mary Powell, A.B Scotland Neck 

Judd, Eugenia Margaret, A.B Sanf ord 

Kelly, Fannie, B,S Abbottsburg 

Kimsey, Elizabeth, A.B Fletcher 

Klutz, Alice Margaret, B,S Asheville 

Lassiter, Mozelle, B.S Apex 

Lee, Myrtle, B.S Benson 



Register of Students 113 

Long, Ruth Virginia, A.B Chapel Hill 

Lowe, Ida Elizabeth, A.B Chadbourn 

Lowe, Alice Louise, A.B Chadbourn 

Martin, Beatrice, A.B Puquay Springs 

Mills, Edna, A.B Apex 

Morgan, Ellie Hortense, A.B Benson 

Morgan, Esther Tabitha, A.B Benson 

Morton, Elizabeth Wilson, A.B Louisburg 

Murchison, Minnie Lambert, A.B Gulf 

Neese, Annie Louise, B.S Greensboro 

Nooe, Katharine Vanney, A.B Statesville 

O'Briant, Sarah Gladys, B.S East Durham 

Oldham, Mabel Elizabeth, A.B Hillsboro 

Owens, Velma Daphne, A.B Walstonburg 

Parker, Clara Lucile, A.B Heathsville 

Perry, Winifred, A.B High Point 

Plybon, Helen Virginia, A.B Roxboro 

Powell, Martha Whitaker, B.S Tarboro 

Rainwater, Pauline, A.B Wadesboro 

Reams, Nannie, B.S Morrisville 

Reams, Susie Irene, A.B Morrisville 

Rhyne, Era Lee, B.S Morganton 

Riddick, Margaret Ann, A.B Trotsville 

Sawyer, Erne, A.B Belcross 

Sawyer, Elizabeth, A.B Belcross 

Sears, Overton, B.S Apex 

Spainhour, Ruby Sydnor, A.B Wilkesboro 

Spurgeon, Carrie Mae, B.S Hillsboro 

Stell, Ruby Louise, B.S Zebulon 

Strickland, Gladys, A.B Dunn 

Sullivan, Mary Elizabeth, B.S Pinnacle 

Tarleton, Pauline, A.B Wadesboro 

Thomas, Mary Emma, A.B Cameron 

Thompson, Tura, A.B Mars Hill 

Tolar, Marjalene Emma, A.B Rennert 

Tomlinson, Gertrude, A.B Lucama 

Tomlinson, Louise, A.B Wilson 

Tuttle, Clarice Louise, A.B Wallburg 

Vann, Selma, A.B Fayetteville 

Wall, Clara Lucile, A.B Wallburg 

Wall, Gladys Elizabeth, B.S Wallburg 

Wallace, Mary, B.S Starr 



114 Meredith College 

Ward, Annie Hope, A.B Bosley 

Webb, Lillian, A.B Edenton 

West, Mabel Moyer, A.B Wilmington 

Weston, Mozelle, A.B Atkinson 

Wilkinson, Mary Elizabeth, A.B Belhaven 

Wilkinson, Rachel, A.B Belhaven 

Williams, Ellen Elizabeth, B.S Wingate 

Williams, Vera Lou, A.B Richlands 

Willif ord, Ethel Blanche, A.B Dunn 

Winkler, Annie Shelton, B.S Boone 

Womble, Mary Evelyn, B.S Cary 

Yates, Dorothy, B.S Raleigh 

Young, Edith Mildred, A.B Fletcher 

SPECIALS 

Flake, • Ida, A.B Wadesboro 

Pritchett, Barre, B.S Greensboro 

Seawell, Cecil Annie, B.S Carthage 

Shaw, Mrs. Harriett May, B.S Raleigh 

Stell, Ruby Lois, B.S Zebulon 

Watson, Mallie Deerborn, B.S Fayetteville 

Weston, Mozelle, B.S Atkinson 

Westfeldt, Mrs. Louise Duggan, B.S Raleigh 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Blanchard, Marguerite, A.B Fuquay Springs 

Butts, Reba Gertrude, B.S Morrisville 

Dula, Mary, A.B Lenoir 

Jackson, Katie Margaret, A.B Thomasville 

Langdon, Lola, A.B Benson 

Lee, Miriam Erdine, A.B Raleigh 

Mooneyham, Ellie, A.B Raleigh 



Register of Students 115 

Summary 

Seniors : 

Registered for A.B. degree 21 

Registered for B.S. degree 7 

Total 28 

Juniors : 

Registered for A.B. degree 11 

Registered for B.S. degree 10 

Total 21 

Sophomores : 

Registered for A.B. degree 27 

Registered for B.S. degree 8 

Total 35 

Freshmen : 

Registered for A.B. degree 86 

Registered for B.S. degree 39 

Total 125 

Total registered for A.B. degree 145 

Total registered for B.S. degree 64 

Total number college classmen 209 

Special 8 

Unclassified 7 

Total irregulars 15 

Students from other schools taking work in the colleges are 

as follows: 

From Art classmen 17 

From Art irregulars 2 

From Music classmen 81 

From Music irregulars 28 

128 

Total 352 



Register of Students 

School of Art 



SENIOR CLASS 

Franklin, Lillian Bryson City 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Holmes, Lucile Graham 

Tillery, Mary Hallie Scotland Neck 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Kale, Goldie Kathleen Mount Holly 

Knight, Elizabeth Louise Chase City, Va. 

Moore, Julia Welling Kinston 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Allbritton, Mary Tignor Calypso 

Caldwell, Rosa Lumberton 

Carroll, Thelma Turkey 

Cox, Carey Winterville 

Humber, Lena Dey Greenville 

Lancaster, Emma Battleboro 

Love, Annie Louise Elizabeth City 

Sisk, Lila Bryson City 

Turlington, Ethel Wilson 

Walker, Maude Blanche Columbia, S. C. 

UNCLASSIFIED 



Lynn, Inez Raleigh 

Payne, Carrie Murphy 



ART ONLY 



Arenson, Mrs. Arthur Raleig 

Coburn, Mrs. Rosina Raleigh 

Dean, Eva Louise Raleigh 

Grimes, Alston Raleigh 



. 



* After 1920-1921 the Department of Art and China Painting will be dis- 
continued. 



Register of Students 117 

Johnston, Ophelia Calhoun Raleigh 

Lawrence, Mrs. Carrie Thomas Raleigh 

Lewis, Maude Raleigh 

Nichols, Mrs. Lawrence Emmett Raleigh 

MacDonald, Janet Raleigh 

Yates, Mrs. Ethel Weathers Raleigh 

York, Margaret Raleigh 



Summary 



Senior 1 

Juniors 2 

Sophomores 3 

Freshmen 10 

Total number college classmen 16 

Unclassified 2 

Art only 11 

13 

Students from other Schools electing work in Art 5 

Students from other Schools electing work in Art History. . 6 

Students from other Schools electing Art Education 4 

15 

Total 44 



Register of Students 

School of Music 

SENIOR CLASS 

Beam, Gladys Mae, Public School Music Woodsdale 

Bridger, Annabel, Voice Bladenboro 

Brooks, Olivia Clarisse, Piano Woodsdale 

Caldwell, Mary Lee, Piano Lumberton 

Clifford, Annie Blankenship, Public School Music Gastonia 

Floyd, Mary, Piano Fairmont 

Goldsmith, Ruth Alison, Piano Southern Pines 

Hinton, Edna Earle, Piano Jacksonville 

Kelly, Lucile Hicks, Public Schpol Music Clinton 

Norman, Mattie Macon, Piano Hertford 

Olive, Nellie Irene, Piano Apex 

Parker, Flora Ethel, Public School Music Heathsville 

Pope, Margaret, Violin Lumberton 

Powell, Louise, Public School Music Fayetteville 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Blalock, Mary Lily, Piano Weldon 

Carroll, Katherine Elizabeth, Piano Winterville 

Gibbs, Katherine, Violin .- Mars Hill 

Hedrick, Madge Thomas, Piano Hertford 

Huntley, Mary Elizabeth, Piano Wadesboro 

Johnston, Nellie Mae, Voice Raleigh 

Mercer, Carolyn, Organ Wilson 

Nye, Beatrice, Voice Memphis, Tenn. 

Paul Fannie, Piano Robersonville 

Peele, Carrie Foy, Piano Roxboro 

Wallace, Edna Elizabeth, Public School Music Johnsonville, S. C. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Baley, Evelyn, Piano Marshall 

Cox, Joscelyn, Organ Asheville 

Dewar, Susan, Piano Raleigh 

Elkins, Mildred Ethel, Piano Whiteville 

Herring, Dixie, Piano Clinton 

Holmes, Helen Hope, Piano Edenton 

Hoyle, Edna Charlotte, Piano Lincolnton 






Register of Students 119 

Johnson, Thelma, Piano Clinton 

Lawrence, Anna Warren, Voice Fuquay Springs 

Mattison, Gertrude, Piano Raleigh 

Poole, Bessie Lee, Voice Raleigh 

Rowland, Florence Beulah, Piano Rocky Mount 

Rowland, Winnie Mae, Public School Music Rocky Mount 

Sentelle, Helen Rebecca, Public School Music Tarboro 

Sheets, Hilda, Piano Lexington 

FKESHMAN CLASS 

Boone, Mary Virginia, Piano Rich Square 

Boyd, Esther, Piano Roxboro 

Byrd, Pearl, Piano Cardenas 

Cooper, Annie Rebecca, Piano Raleigh 

Cornwell, Mary Louise, Piano Kings Mountain 

Creech, Esther, Voice Four Oaks 

Fisher, Grace, Voice Fairmont 

Fleetwood, Elma, Violin Jackson 

Fleetwood, Thelma, Voice Jackson 

Fleming, Marie, Piano Manson 

Gardner, Cate, Piano Warrenton 

Gower, Geraldine Gladys, Piano Clayton 

Grady, Annie Nursie, Piano Goldsboro 

Hall, Ethel, Piano Benson 

Hart, Retta Vann, Piano Boykins, Va. 

Holloman, Janet Whitfield, Piano Jackson 

Honeycutt, Ruby, Piano Raleigh 

Hudson, Ruth, Piano Bentonville 

Land, Dorothy Johnson, Piano Chadbourn 

Lawrence, Lois, Piano Apex 

Lewis, Blanche Eleanor, Voice Atkinson 

MacLean, Lavita Anderson, Piano Franklin, Va. 

Maynard, Edith, Voice Apex 

Nolan, Kathleen, Piano Lawndale 

Patton, Pauline, Voice Morganton 

Penny, Pauline, Piano Cary 

Poole, Winona, Violin Raleigh 

Ramsey, Norma Lee, Voice Marshall 

Rouse, Lillian, Piano Winterville 

Sams, Mae Winnie, Piano Raleigh 

Sanders, Leola, Voice Four Oaks 

Shipp, Elsie Parker, Piano Durham 



120 Meredith College 

Smith, Sadie Bray, Piano Sanford 

Sorrell, Lydia Iris, Piano Lillington 

Taylor, Mildred, Piano Rutherf ordton 

Thompson, Elsie, Piano Lumberton 

Turlington, Annie Rose, Piano Wilson 

Wall, Iola, Voice Wallburg 

Wall, Mary, Voice Wallburg 

White, Frances Dorcas, Voice Scotland Neck 

Wilson, Naomi Utley, Piano Holly Springs 

Wray, Mary Elizabeth, Piano Bournsviile 

IRREGULARS 

Barksdale, Mildred, Piano Red Hill, Va. 

Bennett, Mary Lucile, Piano Middleburg 

Burleson, Carrie Lee, Piano Albemarle 

Chaney, Margaret Lucile, Piano Wingate 

Gibbs, Esther Parthana, Piano Mill Springs 

Gibbs, Ola, Piano Marion 

Greene, Katherine, Piano Oxford 

Gregory, Jennie Payne, Piano Moyoek 

Hand, Flonnie, Piano Belmont 

Heath, Mary, Piano Harmony 

Hinson, Jewell Flora, Piano Goldsboro 

Johnson, Nadine Laura, Piano ». Dell 

Matthews, Willie Mae, Piano Nashville 

May, Annie Lou, Piano Asheville 

McClure, Pauline Edith, Piano Canton 

Mills, Mary, Piano Atkinson 

Newton, Corinna Marjorie, Piano Hurdle Mills 

Outlaw, Myra, Piano Kinston 

Sawyer, Hattie, Piano Bellhaven 

Sledge, Gladys, Piano Rocky Mount 

Smith, Lyda Mavrick, Piano MoCullers 

Smith, Mildred Mae, Piano Goldsboro 

Spencer, Willie Mae, Piano Englehard 

Todd, Rachael, Piano Wendell 

Watkins, Lucile Evelyn, Piano Monroe 

Wiggins, Pearl, Piano Wendell 

Wilson, Louise A., Piano Manson 

Woodworth, Mabel Ames, Piano Duke 



Register of Students 121 



Students Not in Residence Taking College Music Only 

Adams, J. R., Voice Raleigh 

Alderman, J. B., Voice Raleigh 

Bailey, Rosalind, Voice Raleigh 

Bass, Mrs. Lois Massey, Voice Raleigh 

Batchelor, Margaret Alice, Voice Raleigh 

Blackburn, Maudleen, Voice Raleigh 

Bland, Mrs. Ruby Williams, Voice Raleigh 

Brassfield, Lucy, Voice Raleigh 

Broughton, Needham Bryant, Voice Raleigh 

M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Brown, Mrs. Annie Hoover, Voice Raleigh 

Brown, Susie E., Voice Raleigh 

Byrum, Gladys, Voice Raleigh 

Campbell, J. A., Violin Raleigh 

Carroll, Mary Jane, Voice Raleigh 

A.B., Meredith College. 

Coburn, Mrs. Rosina, Voice Raleigh 

Cole, Blonnie, Voice Raleigh 

Correll, Mrs. Annie Angell, Voice Raleigh 

Davis, Mildred, Voice Raleigh 

Dean, Eva Louise, Voice Raleigh 

Deem, Blanche, Organ Raleigh 

Denton, Maurie B., Voice Raleigh 

Dewar, Gladys, Voice Raleigh 

Dughi, Margaret Cecilia, Voice Raleigh 

Edwards, Mrs. Annie Brown, Voice Raleigh 

Elliott, Margaret Blow, Violin Raleigh 

Farrar, Willie Belle, Piano Raleigh 

Ferrell, Ethel Lois, Voice Raleigh 

Gower, Christine, Piano Raleigh 

Groves, Christine, Piano Raleigh 

Green, Charles Sylvester, Violin Raleigh 

Hamilton, Elsie, Voice Raleigh 

Hawkins, Marie, Voice Raleigh 

Haynes, Emma Isabelle, Voice Raleigh 

Heinzerling, Henry A., Voice Raleigh 

Henley, Jesse, M., Voice Raleigh 

Hinshaw, Eunice, Voice Raleigh 

Horn, Leila Noffsinger, Voice Raleigh 

Mus.B., Oberlin Conservatory of Music. 



122 Meredith College 

Horton, Florrie, Voice Raleigh. 

Johnson, Mary Louise, Voice Raleigh 

Jones, Edna, Violin Raleigh 

Kaplan, Eva, Voice Raleigh 

Kidwell, Avis. L., Organ. . . . Raleigh 

Lewis, Annie H., Piano Raleigh 

MacQueen, Flora, Voice Raleigh 

Moore, Mrs. Flonnie Warren, Voice Raleigh 

Nail, Annie Mabelle, Voice Raleigh 

A.B., Meredith College. 

Nobles, Flossie, Voice Raleigh 

O'Kelly, Mary, Piano Raleigh 

Parks, Dorothy, Voice Raleigh 

Perry, Mary, Voice •. Raleigh 

Riddle, Caswell Archer, Voice Raleigh 

Rives', Mrs. Nellie B., Voice Raleigh 

Rudy, Mrs. Nannie Ruth, Voice Raleigh 

Sears, Alfred Ledie, Voice Raleigh 

Seligson, Sylvia, Voice Raleigh 

Smith, Mrs. Helena, Piano Raleigh 

Sowell, Juanita, Voice Raleigh 

Stevenson, Lina, Voice . . . < Raleigh 

Thomas, Eugenia Hendren, Voice Raleigh 

Diploma in Piano, Meredith College. 

Stonebanks, Mrs. Nell, Voice Raleigh 

Templeton, Mrs. Roberta Osborne, Organ Raleigh 

Wiggs, Mary, Voice Raleigh 

Williams, Evelyn, Voice Raleigh 

Winston, Thelma, Voice Raleigh 

Womble, Emma, Voice. Raleigh 

Woodall, Ben Earle, Voice Raleigh 

Woodall, Lucy May, Voice Raleigh, 






Register of Students 123 

Summary 

Seniors : 

Registered for Diploma in Piano 7 

Registered for Diploma in Violin 1 

Registered for Diploma in Voice 1 

Registered for Diploma in Public School Music 5 

Total 14 

Juniors : 

Registered for Diploma in Piano 7 

Registered for Diploma in Violin 1 

Registered for Diploma in Voice 2 

Registered for Diploma in Public School Music 1 

Total 11 

Sophomores : 

Registered for Diploma in Piano 11 

Registered for Diploma in Voice 2 

Registered for Diploma in Public School Music 2 

Total 15 

Freshmen : 

Registered for Diploma in Piano 29 

Registered for Diploma in Violin 2 

Registered for Diploma in Voice 11 

Total 42 

Total classmen registered in each department of Music: 

Piano 54 

Violin 4 

Voice 16 

Public School Music 8 

Total 82 

Irregular students: 

Piano 28 

Total 28 



124 Meredith College 

Summary of Students Not in Residence Taking 
College Music Only 

Piano 6 

Violin 4 

Voice 54 

Organ 3 

Total 67 

Students from other Schools taking College Music are as 
follows : 

From college classmen 25 

Prom the unclassified 2 

Total 27 

Pinal total 204 



Register of Students 125 

Final Summary Students Taking College Work 

Classmen in college 209 

Special college 15 

Students from other Schools taking one or more courses in 
the college 128 

352 

Classmen in Art 16 

Irregulars in Art 2 

Art only 11 

Students from other Schools taking work in Art 5 

Students from other Schools taking work in Art History. . . 6 
Students from other Schools electing Art Education 4 

44 

Classmen in Music 82 

Irregulars in Music 28 

College Music only 67 

Students from other Schools taking work in College Music. . 25 

202 

Total 598 

Deducting students counted in more than one School 170 

Total 428 



Summary by States 



North Carolina 402 

Virginia 14 

South Carolina 3 

Tennessee 2 

Texas 2 

Alabama 1 

Georgia 1 

Missouri 1 

New Jersey 1 

China 1 

Total 428 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 









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